Is There a Gravitational Spectrum for Measuring Wavelengths?

In summary, the conversation discusses the potential existence of a gravitational spectrum and the idea of a "gravitational doppler effect" caused by gravitational waves. However, it is concluded that the gravitational waves produced by the solar system are too small to explain the observed Pioneer and Flyby anomalies.
  • #1
sysreset
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Contemplating the propogation of Gravitation at roughly c in the form of a wave, has anyone ever attempted to quantify lambda, or the wavelength, in terms of meters or some other unit? Is there a gravitational spectrum, like there is an electromagnetic spectrum? And finally, could there be any possibility of gravitational lambda shift, when objects move past each other rapidly, thinking in terms of the recently publicized Pioneer and Flyby Anomalies?
 
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  • #2
There is expected to be a spectrum of primordial gravitational waves with a particular signature the is the same everywhere in the sky, rather like the cosmic microwave background. On top of this it is expected that there will be occasional transient point sources of gravitational waves from colliding black holes and similar events.

I'm not sure what you are referring to with regards to the Pioneer and Flyby anomalies? I can't think of anyway in which they are related to gravity waves? Can you clarify what you meant?
 
  • #3
NASA has looked at the data for six probes (Pioneer, Gallileo, NEAR, Rosetta, Cassini, MESSENGER) with rapid velocities from and toward the sun and there are anomalies with respect to unexplained acceleration towards the sun. ( See http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/080229- spacecraft -anomaly.html ) I was wondering if acceleration in alignment with gravitational waves would cause come kind of "gravitational doppler effect" but this would depend on the "wavelength" of gravitational waves from the sun...
 
  • #4
The gravitational waves produced by the solar system are ridiculously small. If they were big enough to cause the Pioneer anomaly then gravitational waves from supernovae in our galaxy would tear the solar system apart (maybe not but they would be very obvious). It's not so much wavelength as amplitude, they just aren't strong enough to explain the Pioneer anomaly.
 

What are gravitational wavelengths?

Gravitational wavelengths are a measure of the distance between successive peaks or troughs in a gravitational wave.

How are gravitational wavelengths measured?

Gravitational wavelengths are typically measured in units of meters or kilometers using specialized instruments such as interferometers.

What is the relationship between gravitational wavelengths and the source of a gravitational wave?

The source of a gravitational wave, such as a binary system or a supernova, determines the frequency and amplitude of the wave, which in turn determines the gravitational wavelength.

Can gravitational wavelengths be observed directly?

No, gravitational wavelengths cannot be observed directly as they are extremely small and can only be detected through their effects on spacetime.

What is the significance of studying gravitational wavelengths?

Studying gravitational wavelengths can provide valuable insights into the nature of the universe, including the behavior of massive objects and the effects of gravitational waves on spacetime.

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