IUPAC nomenclature problem

In summary: I have a feeling that textbooks used to have a lot more information than what is currently available.In summary, the two different names are the same compound, but the one starting with ethyl is the better name.
  • #1

Krushnaraj Pandya

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Homework Statement


My only doubt while solving a larger problem is whether 4-Ethyl,3,3-Dimethyl Hexane and 3-Ethyl,4,4-Dimethyl Hexane equivalent?
 
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  • #2
Yes. Same. I am not sure if one of those names is more correct than the other, but they are the same.
 
  • #3
symbolipoint said:
Yes. Same. I am not sure if one of those names is more correct than the other, but they are the same.
Do either names violate any nomenclature rules?
shouldn't ethyl be given preference and a lower number since it comes first alphabetically?
 
  • #4
Krushnaraj Pandya said:
Do either names violate any nomenclature rules?
shouldn't ethyl be given preference and a lower number since it comes first alphabetically?
That finishes the answer. The Ethyl is bigger than the Methyl, so counting ascendingly along the chain, 3-ethyl,4,4-dimethyl hexane.

difficult to read but might help as a review for some things: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IUPAC_nomenclature_of_organic_chemistry

The two different names are the same compound but the one starting with ethyl is the better name.
 
  • #5
symbolipoint said:
That finishes the answer. The Ethyl is bigger than the Methyl, so counting ascendingly along the chain, 3-ethyl,4,4-dimethyl hexane.

difficult to read but might help as a review for some things: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IUPAC_nomenclature_of_organic_chemistry

The two different names are the same compound but the one starting with ethyl is the better name.
Alright, thank you very much :D
 
  • #6
Learning to name organic compounds was easy from the books available back then as a student. Modern day textbooks I assume are just as good. That wikipedia article showed much legalistic descriptions of how to name compounds, but further down was guidance for what was needed for your example compound.
 
  • #7
I took a look at it and found learning nomenclature of ethers and esters very useful (not given in my textbook) but it was quite tiring to read and keep all the rules in mind while reading ahead...although I have encountered a more intriguing nomenclature problem which I'm about to post
 
  • #8
Students in school and using both their in-class instruction and assigned textbook readings deal with far fewer rules at the start, and then are given just enough of needed nomenclature instruction as their studies progress. Like I said, much easier to handle the learning that way.
 
  • #9
symbolipoint said:
Students in school and using both their in-class instruction and assigned textbook readings deal with far fewer rules at the start, and then are given just enough of needed nomenclature instruction as their studies progress. Like I said, much easier to handle the learning that way.
the trouble with me is I can't learn inside a classroom at all due to various factors. However I am adept at learning from a textbook extremely well, so this forum is a blessing for me and the only way I don't get stuck anywhere while contemplating a problem. I'm not sure if this will work for organic chemistry though...
 

1. What is IUPAC nomenclature?

IUPAC nomenclature is a set of rules and guidelines used to name chemical compounds in a systematic and internationally-recognized way.

2. Why is IUPAC nomenclature important?

IUPAC nomenclature ensures that all chemical compounds have a unique, standardized name, making it easier for scientists to communicate and understand each other's research. It also helps to avoid confusion and errors when working with chemical compounds.

3. What is the main problem with IUPAC nomenclature?

The main problem with IUPAC nomenclature is that it can be complex and difficult to understand, especially for beginners. It also relies on a set of rules, which can lead to different names for the same compound depending on how the rules are applied.

4. How can I solve an IUPAC nomenclature problem?

The best way to solve an IUPAC nomenclature problem is to carefully follow the rules and guidelines set by IUPAC. It may also be helpful to use online tools or consult with a chemistry expert for assistance.

5. Are there any exceptions to IUPAC nomenclature?

Yes, there are some exceptions to IUPAC nomenclature, especially for complex or highly specialized compounds. In these cases, alternative naming systems may be used, but it is important to ensure that the name is still understandable and follows some sort of systematic approach.

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