Looking for Projectile Motion [3D] Literature

In summary, understanding projectile motion in three dimensions requires knowledge of trajectory, launch angle, and initial velocity. Resources such as "Projectile Motion in Three Dimensions" by R. E. Collins and "Projectile Motion in Three Dimensions: An Undergraduate Laboratory" by J. M. Fanchi can provide helpful information and exercises. Wind and its effects on projectile motion can be incorporated using vector addition, and the concept of ballistic trajectories may also be useful in designing a program to calculate correct angles and power for a projectile.
  • #1
Willis
1
0
Hi,

Forgive me for being vague, but I'm looking for some literature about understanding projectile motion in the third dimension. Possibly with algorithms.

My desired goal is to put the information to use twoards a PC game that bases itself around firing projectiles. I've yet to fully understand its unit of measurment standards, hence my vagueness.

Wind operates on the label of "forces". 0->5. Through questions from the game designer, wind is quite linear. Respectively Force 0 is no wind, but Force 1 being "X". Force 2 is 2x, Force 3 is 3x, etc...

Also, and I don't know yet how litteral he means this, (if the variable is the same value.) but wind has also been stated as "horizontal gravity". I believe he means to the fact that, wind forces do not change via elevation changes or terrain.

-----

I've only begun this task, so I'm looking for basic sources or testimony's from this community to head me in the right direction.

My in-the-end goal would be, to design a program (I'll likely choose PHP) input a set of variables:

Position 1: X/Y/Z
Position 2: X/Y/Z
Wind: Direction/Force
Gravity (hard-coded constant most likely)

And it produce a list of data: Horizontal Rotation (0-360.0), Angle (0-90.0), and "Power" (scale of 0-1000.0)

That would produce the correct shot from Position 1, to Position 2. (I would probably design it to work off of a constant or two, and then have it produce the other value(s). )
 
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  • #2




Hi there,

Projectile motion in three dimensions can be a complex topic, but there is plenty of literature and research available to help you understand it. Some key concepts to consider are trajectory, launch angle, and initial velocity.

One resource you may find helpful is "Projectile Motion in Three Dimensions" by R. E. Collins, which discusses the equations and algorithms used to calculate projectile motion in three dimensions. Another useful resource is "Projectile Motion in Three Dimensions: An Undergraduate Laboratory" by J. M. Fanchi, which provides practical examples and exercises for understanding and applying the concepts.

In terms of wind and its effects on projectile motion, you'll want to consider the wind's direction and velocity, as well as the density of the air. The force of the wind can be incorporated into your calculations using vector addition.

To help with your specific goal of designing a program, you may also want to look into the concept of ballistic trajectories and how they are calculated. This will give you a better understanding of how to determine the correct angle and power for a projectile to reach a specific target.

Overall, I would recommend starting with these resources and then exploring further based on your specific needs and goals. Good luck with your project!
 
  • #3


I would first recommend familiarizing yourself with the basic principles of projectile motion in a 3D space. This includes understanding the equations and concepts of position, velocity, acceleration, and force in three dimensions. There are many textbooks and online resources available that cover these topics in detail.

Once you have a solid understanding of the fundamentals, you can then begin to explore the specific application of projectile motion in a PC game. This may involve researching algorithms and programming techniques for calculating and simulating 3D projectile motion.

In terms of wind and its effects on projectile motion, it is important to note that wind is a vector quantity, meaning it has both magnitude and direction. This means that simply increasing the "force" of the wind may not accurately reflect its true impact on the projectile's trajectory. Instead, you may want to consider incorporating the wind's direction and magnitude into your calculations using vector addition.

Lastly, I would recommend collaborating with other experts in the field, such as game designers and programmers, to ensure that your program accurately reflects the physics of projectile motion and is user-friendly for the game. Good luck with your project!
 

Related to Looking for Projectile Motion [3D] Literature

What is projectile motion?

Projectile motion is the motion of an object thrown or launched into the air, subject to only the acceleration of gravity.

What is the difference between 2D and 3D projectile motion?

In 2D projectile motion, the object only moves in two dimensions - horizontally and vertically. In 3D projectile motion, the object also moves in a third dimension, typically represented as the z-axis.

What factors affect projectile motion?

The factors that affect projectile motion include the initial velocity of the object, the angle at which it is launched, the mass of the object, and the force of gravity.

How does air resistance impact projectile motion?

Air resistance can impact projectile motion by slowing down the object and changing its trajectory. This is because air resistance creates a force that opposes the motion of the object through the air.

What are some real-life applications of projectile motion?

Projectile motion is used in a variety of real-life applications, such as sports (e.g. throwing a ball), transportation (e.g. launching a rocket), and military operations (e.g. firing a missile).

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