Magnetic field due to wire and conducting plane

In summary, the conversation revolves around a physics problem involving a wire with current and a conducting plane. The question asks about the magnetic field above and below the plane, and the answer is given as 0 for below the plane and (mu)I/2πx for above the plane. The problem is mentioned to be from irodov's general physics book and the person has used Ampere's law to find the solution, but is confused about the region below the plane and why the solution is given for half of the wire.
  • #1
bsdnoob
< Mentor Note -- thread moved to HH from the technical physics forums, so no HH Template is shown >

This problem is bugging me since a week so I decided to post this here

Suppose we have a wire with some current 'I' and which at a point 'o' spreads radially in all direction along conducting plane perpendicular to wire so what will be magnetic field at above and below plane?Here's the diagram
MTWNpFM.jpg

My approach to this problem was to find magnetic field due to individual current carrying elements . For wire I used Ampere's law to find it as B= (mu) . I /4πx (for half infinite wire)but I am confused about it from conducting plane ? Answer is given to be 0 for region below plane , how is this possible? And for above plane is given (mu)I/2πx but how? can someone help?
This problem is given in irodov's general physics book. (3.232)
 
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  • #2
bsdnoob said:
(for half infinite wire)
Why half?
 
  • #3
Using Ampere's law sounds like a good approach. Can you explain in detail how you set up Ampere's law to get your answer?
 

What is a magnetic field?

A magnetic field is an area in which a magnetic force can be detected. It is created by moving electric charges, such as those found in wires and conducting planes.

How is a magnetic field created by a wire?

When an electric current flows through a wire, it creates a magnetic field around the wire. The direction of the magnetic field is determined by the direction of the current, following the right-hand rule.

What is the magnetic field due to a wire?

The magnetic field due to a wire is directly proportional to the current flowing through the wire and inversely proportional to the distance from the wire. This relationship is described by the Biot-Savart law.

How does a conducting plane affect a magnetic field?

A conducting plane can either enhance or reduce the strength of a magnetic field, depending on its orientation relative to the wire. When the plane is parallel to the wire, it can create a stronger magnetic field. When it is perpendicular, it can weaken the field.

Is the magnetic field due to a wire and conducting plane affected by the material they are made of?

The magnetic field due to a wire and conducting plane is not affected by the material they are made of, as long as they are good conductors. The strength of the magnetic field is determined by the current and distance, not the material.

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