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Magnetic field due to wire and conducting plane

  1. Dec 21, 2014 #1
    < Mentor Note -- thread moved to HH from the technical physics forums, so no HH Template is shown >

    This problem is bugging me since a week so I decided to post this here

    Suppose we have a wire with some current 'I' and which at a point 'o' spreads radially in all direction along conducting plane perpendicular to wire so what will be magnetic field at above and below plane?


    Here's the diagram MTWNpFM.jpg
    My approach to this problem was to find magnetic field due to individual current carrying elements . For wire I used Ampere's law to find it as B= (mu) . I /4πx (for half infinite wire)but I am confused about it from conducting plane ? Answer is given to be 0 for region below plane , how is this possible? And for above plane is given (mu)I/2πx but how? can someone help?
    This problem is given in irodov's general physics book. (3.232)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 22, 2014
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 22, 2014 #2

    Bystander

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    Why half?
     
  4. Dec 22, 2014 #3

    TSny

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    Using Ampere's law sounds like a good approach. Can you explain in detail how you set up Ampere's law to get your answer?
     
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