Meter Circuit: Calculating Scale Reading with and without Additional Resistor

In summary, the conversation discusses a circuit with a linear scale meter that has not been calibrated and has a scale reading of 20. The conversation goes on to discuss the current in the circuit and how it is affected by adding a 2000 ohm resistor. The correct answer is determined by using the formula I = k*θ, where k is the constant of the meter and θ is the deflection in the meter. The final answer is 25, which is found by equating the current with k*θ.
  • #1
thereddevils
438
0

Homework Statement



Meter in the circuit shown has a linear scale that has not been calibrated and the scale reading is 20 . When another resistor of resistance 2000 ohm is connected across XY . What is the scale reading of the meter

Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution



Without the 2000 ohm resistor , I= 1.5 /(2995 + 50) , I = 0.0005

the reading given by the ammeter is 40600 times of the actual current .

now with the resistor , I = 1.5/(2995 + 50+2000) , I = 0.0003

the reading by the ammater will be 0.0003 x 40600 = 12

but the answer given is 25
 

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  • #2

Without the 2000 ohm resistor , I= 1.5 /(2995 + 50) , I = 0.0005

This is wrong. In the given circuit the total resistance is (2995+50 +2000)
Find the current I.
I = k*θ. where k is the constant of the meter and θ is the deflection in the mete.
When you connect another 2000 ohm resistance in parallel with 2000 ohm resistance in the circuit, what is net resistance in the circuit? Find the current and equate it to k*θ'. find θ'.
 
  • #3
rl.bhat said:

Without the 2000 ohm resistor , I= 1.5 /(2995 + 50) , I = 0.0005

This is wrong. In the given circuit the total resistance is (2995+50 +2000)
Find the current I.
I = k*θ. where k is the constant of the meter and θ is the deflection in the mete.
When you connect another 2000 ohm resistance in parallel with 2000 ohm resistance in the circuit, what is net resistance in the circuit? Find the current and equate it to k*θ'. find θ'.

got it ! Thanks !
 

What is a meter circuit?

A meter circuit is an electrical circuit that is used to measure the amount of electricity flowing through a particular point in a circuit. It typically consists of a meter, such as a voltmeter or ammeter, and a series of wires and components that allow for accurate measurements to be taken.

What are the components of a meter circuit?

The components of a meter circuit can vary depending on the type of meter being used, but typically include a meter, a shunt or current transformer, and various wires and connectors. Some meter circuits may also include additional components such as resistors or capacitors for more accurate measurements.

How does a meter circuit work?

A meter circuit works by using the principles of electromagnetism. The meter, which is calibrated to measure a specific type of electrical current, is connected in series with the circuit being measured. As the current flows through the circuit, it also flows through the meter, which then displays the measurement based on the movement of a needle or digital display.

What is the purpose of a meter circuit?

The purpose of a meter circuit is to accurately measure the amount of electricity flowing through a particular point in a circuit. This information can be used to monitor and troubleshoot electrical systems, as well as ensure that the correct amount of electricity is being used in a given circuit.

What are some common types of meter circuits?

Some common types of meter circuits include voltmeter circuits, ammeter circuits, and wattmeter circuits. Other specialized types of meter circuits include multimeter circuits, which can measure multiple types of electrical quantities, and oscilloscope circuits, which can display the waveform of an electrical signal.

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