Non-parallel double slit experiment

In summary: The conclusion that can be drawn from this picture is that the light that is circled didn't go through the diagonal slits. However, it's unclear whether this conclusion is valid or not.
  • #1
Devin-M
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Is it possible to tell which slit some of the light went through when the slits aren’t parallel (green & red boxes in option 3)?

I used a Bahtinov mask to cover the aperture of my 600mm f/9 lens while observing the star Polaris. Various open slits were tested while others were covered with masking tape. -
All exposures were 5 minutes with a 656nm narrowband filter on a Nikon D800 @ 6400iso. Only option 4 appears to show a double slit interference pattern while options 1, 2 & 3 appear to show a single slit interference pattern.

14-jpg.jpg

02CB6C6D-9F93-42DF-A0C5-F25A48506D66.jpeg


12-jpg.jpg
13-jpg.jpg


69677B3C-86DB-4C0B-B117-8EEEFDB95D26.jpeg

BEB6D57C-6BED-473E-8558-E321416AC426.jpeg

RAW Files: https://u.pcloud.link/publink/show?code=kZcjE2VZR1eBfOCgGAYfuGOv9EMgPH3KIR07

A bit of prior discussion…
Post in thread 'Diffraction Effects and Artifacts in Telescopes like the JWST'
https://www.physicsforums.com/threa...telescopes-like-the-jwst.1047305/post-6823238
 
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  • #3
Devin-M said:
Is it possible to tell which slit some of the light went through when the slits aren’t parallel
I was going to say what I said in the thread you linked to, that you can't tell which slit the light went through. But after thinking about the problem more, I have to confess that I don't actually know. I'm assuming the more your rotate the slits relative to each other, the less correlation their patterns have, as image #3 appears to show.
 
  • #4
The point is that if you make it possible to observe, through which slit a photon comes with certainty, you completely loose the interference pattern. On the other hand, if you want an interference pattern with the best contrast you can get you need perfect ignorance of the which-way information. You can of course have everything between these two extremes, i.e., you can have some probabilistic information through which slit the photon came (i.e., with some probability larger than 1/2 a photon came through one of the slits instead of the other) at the cost of lower contrast of the interference pattern and vice versa. This, of course, is a typical wave phenomenon applying to both classical waves as well as single quanta (photons) of the quantized field.
 
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  • #5
vanhees71 said:
On the other hand, if you want an interference pattern with the best contrast you can get you need perfect ignorance of the which-way information.

The picture below seems a strange case… on the one hand, for the circled light (vertical spikes) we see a strong interference pattern and don’t know exactly which slit the light went through, on the other hand it seems like we also can deduce with high probability the circled light didn’t go through the diagonal slits…

F596F6FC-1178-4B86-801B-C8018D7CB120.jpeg
 
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1. What is a non-parallel double slit experiment?

A non-parallel double slit experiment is a scientific experiment that involves shining a beam of light through two slits that are not parallel to each other. This creates an interference pattern, which can be used to study the properties of light and determine its behavior.

2. How is a non-parallel double slit experiment different from a regular double slit experiment?

In a regular double slit experiment, the two slits are parallel to each other. In a non-parallel double slit experiment, the two slits are at an angle to each other, which creates a different interference pattern.

3. What is the purpose of a non-parallel double slit experiment?

The purpose of a non-parallel double slit experiment is to study the properties of light, such as its wavelength and behavior as a wave. It can also be used to demonstrate the wave-particle duality of light.

4. What are some applications of a non-parallel double slit experiment?

A non-parallel double slit experiment is used in various fields such as optics, quantum mechanics, and astronomy. It can also be used to study the properties of other types of waves, such as sound waves.

5. What are the limitations of a non-parallel double slit experiment?

One limitation of a non-parallel double slit experiment is that it can only be used to study the behavior of light or other waves. It cannot be used to study the behavior of particles. Additionally, the accuracy of the results may be affected by factors such as the distance between the slits and the light source.

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