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Norton theorem,max. power transfer

  1. Mar 7, 2014 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    How should I calculate the max. power transfer to Xload?
    The (20+30j) of Xload,it is not necessary.

    2. Relevant equations

    I try to find the answer,but I got two answers by different method.

    3. The attempt at a solution

    attachment.php?attachmentid=67357&stc=1&d=1394190548.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 7, 2014
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 7, 2014 #2

    gneill

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    Staff: Mentor

    Question: Why does your diagram bother to specify a load impedance (20 + 30j) if it's just going to be replaced with the complex conjugate of the Norton (or Thevenin) impedance? Are you sure that the problem is asking for this rather than, say, the peak instantaneous power delivered to the given load?

    For what you've shown, your "second method" gives a correct answer. I'm not sure what the first method is all about; I don't recall seeing it before.
     
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