Physical asymptote

  • #1
LagrangeEuler
699
19

Homework Statement


For example particle performs a motion in x-y plane. In y there are walls from both side so particle can go in y direction from zero to [tex]h[/tex]. I need to plot trajectory. If I got trajectory [tex]y=x^4-x^2[/tex] then
[tex]\lim_{x\to \infty}y(x)=\infty[/B]


Homework Equations




The Attempt at a Solution


If I got trajectory [tex]y=x^4-x^2[/tex] then
[tex]\lim_{x\to \infty}y(x)=\infty[/tex], but because of the condition I may say that [tex]\lim_{x\to \infty}y(x)=h[/tex]. Maybe then [tex]y=h[/tex] is some natural horisontal asymptote?[/B]
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Goddar
205
16
Hi. It's hard to understand what your problem exactly is. Could you clarify it maybe by giving its original statement?
If you are asked to plot a two-dimensional trajectory parametrized by:
y = x4–x2,
Under the constraint: ymax= h,
Then it gives you a natural constraint on x as well, as a function of h; if you need to plot this you'll have to assign an arbitrary value to h so that you can plot something.
Now depending on this value, your plot will not always look the same but that's all you can do with the given information...
 

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