Possible title: Could Discontinuous Spacetime Explain Gravity?

In summary, current theory suggests that high concentrations of matter can warp space-time and create gravity. This is described by the Einstein field equations, which explain how matter and energy interact with spacetime. However, a reinterpretation of these equations could suggest an alternative explanation for the formation of planets and stars. This alternative theory suggests that discontinuous areas of spacetime could result in concentrated areas of gravity, which then attract matter. However, this theory is not supported by the Oppenheimer-Snyder solution, which describes how matter behaves in general relativity. Additionally, there is no evidence to suggest that there are discontinuous areas of spacetime in the theory.
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Donald Marks
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According to current theory, high concentrations of matter warp space-time and create gravity.
The Einstein field equations EFE describe the fundamental interaction of gravitation as a result of spacetime being curved by matter and energy.
Would not a reinterpretation of the EFE lead to the following alternative explanation of how matter collects to form planets and stars? Rather than matter collecting, distorting space-time and thereby creating gravity effect, could discontinuous areas of SpaceTime result in concentrated areas of gravity which then attract collections of matter?
 
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Donald Marks said:
Would not a reinterpretation of the EFE lead to the following alternative explanation of how matter collects to form planets and stars? Rather than matter collecting, distorting space-time and thereby creating gravity effect, could discontinuous areas of SpaceTime result in concentrated areas of gravity which then attract collections of matter?

No, because there are no discontinuous areas of spacetime in the theory.
The Oppenheimer-Snyder solution to the Einstein field equations describes how infalling matter behaves in general relativity.
 
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In addition, there would be no reason why those regions of spacetime should exactly follow the matter in literally all experiments (including those where matter is accelerated by other forces, like electromagnetism). Unless the matter (more precisely, the stress energy tensor) itself is the source of gravity.
 
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Nugatory said:
No, because there are no discontinuous areas of spacetime in the theory.
The Oppenheimer-Snyder solution to the Einstein field equations describes how infalling matter behaves in general relativity.
It is my understanding that discontinuous areas of spacetime are not excluded in the theory. Discontinuities could not in practicality be excluded by observation.
 
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Donald Marks said:
It is my understanding that discontinuous areas of spacetime are not excluded in the theory.

Where are you getting that understanding from? Spacetime is a continuous 4-dimensional manifold in GR.

Donald Marks said:
Discontinuities could not in practicality be excluded by observation.

Why not?

I think you need to be much more precise in explaining exactly what you mean by "discontinuities in spacetime".
 

1. What is the cause of gravity?

The cause of gravity is the curvature of space-time caused by the presence of massive objects. This curvature causes objects to be attracted to each other, creating the force we know as gravity.

2. Is gravity a cause or an effect?

Gravity can be considered both a cause and an effect. It is a cause in the sense that it is the force that causes objects to be attracted to each other. However, it is also an effect of the curvature of space-time, which is caused by the presence of massive objects.

3. How does gravity affect the movement of objects?

Gravity affects the movement of objects by creating a force that pulls them towards each other. This force is proportional to the mass of the objects and the distance between them. The greater the mass and the closer the distance, the stronger the force of gravity.

4. Can gravity be manipulated or controlled?

Gravity is a fundamental force of nature and cannot be directly manipulated or controlled. However, its effects can be manipulated, such as through the use of rockets or artificial satellites.

5. How does the theory of relativity explain gravity?

The theory of relativity explains gravity as the curvature of space-time caused by the presence of massive objects. It also explains that the effects of gravity can be observed as the bending of light and the slowing of time. This theory has been proven through various experiments and observations.

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