Powering a 555 Timer Circuit with 9VDC Battery

  • Thread starter oneamp
  • Start date
In summary, the individual built a circuit using a 555 timer and wanted to power it with a 9VDC battery. However, they discovered that the 555 timer still uses current when the output is low. They thought about using a monostable multivibrator instead and asked for any ideas to prevent the 555 from drawing current when not in use. Suggestions were made to use a CMOS version of the 555 timer or a different device, such as the LMC555 or 74HC123, which have low power consumption. The individual was also directed to look into different application examples for the 74HC123, which allows for the use of different capacitors or resistors for varying timing.
  • #1
oneamp
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I built a circuit using a 555 timer, and I want it to be powered from a 9VDC battery. Only, 555s use current even when their output is low. I thought about changing it for a monostable multivibrator, having the ground of the chip connected to the collector of an NPN transistor, the output also tied to the base, so that when the base was activated (via a momentary press button), the multivibrator would keep the transistor base high until the output was off, and not use any power when the output was low.

But, I'm not sure if that idea will work well. So I am asking if there is anything I can do to keep the 555 from drawing current when not in use. Control of the circuit is done only with the momentary push button, which activates the 555 trigger. No on/off switches or anything like that.

Thanks for any ideas.
 
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  • #2
If you switch the low side of the power supply then the output will float up even when you want it off. Do something similar and switch the + supply. You are on the right track. I have never looked to see what a 555 draws, maybe a CMOS version would be more battery friendly? Or maybe there is a better choice device to use?
 
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  • #4
Even the cmos 555 versions have R1/R2/R3. Look at cmos monostable multivibrators like the 74HC123. There are a zillion different one shots/multivibrators. Just pick the one that suits you need. High voltage cmos, High speed cmos, re-triggerable, not retriggerable.

BTW, I HATE the 555. It's only usefull if you really need the ratio'ed references or you happen to have one handy.
 
  • #5
Thanks. The CSS555C requires way too much effort for building a programmer. Further, I'm not sure that I could use separate capacitor and resistor pairs with it to change the timing, which I plan to do with a switch.

I see the LMC555 advertises a '1 mW typical power dissipation". Does this mean that it uses 1mW while idle (low output)? If this is the case, I can have a few weeks of battery life assuming ~550 mAh in a 9V battery. Better, but still draining fast when I'm not using it. What about the CMOS 555 with a transistor setup like in my idea? Will that work?

Thank you
 
  • #6
the 74HC123 has 4ua standby current.
 
  • #7
meBigGuy said:
the 74HC123 has 4ua standby current.

I was looking at that as an alternative as well. Thanks for directing me to that version of the 123
 
  • #8
So, This 74HC123 with something like a 100k ohm resistor on the base of a transistor to allow current up to 75mA through the collector to a load for a period of time, variable and dictated by a switch that connects different capacitors to the IC. Does this sound appropriate?

Thank you
 
Last edited:
  • #9
pretty much. There are lots of application examples for the 123, 121 and other monostables. You can connect different capacitors or different resistors, or use a current dac for the resistor. The field is wide open.
 
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  • #10
thanks
 

1. How long will a 9VDC battery power a 555 timer circuit?

The duration of power for a 9VDC battery will depend on the specific components and setup of the 555 timer circuit. Generally, a 9VDC battery can power a simple 555 timer circuit for several hours to a few days.

2. Can a 555 timer circuit be powered with a different voltage battery?

Yes, a 555 timer circuit can be powered with a different voltage battery, but it is important to note that the output frequency and timing of the circuit will be affected. It is recommended to stick to the recommended voltage for optimal performance.

3. How can I increase the battery life of a 555 timer circuit?

To increase the battery life of a 555 timer circuit, you can use a lower power version of the 555 timer chip, such as the 555L. You can also reduce the current consumption of the circuit by using higher value resistors and capacitors.

4. Can I use multiple 9VDC batteries to power a 555 timer circuit?

Yes, you can use multiple 9VDC batteries in series to increase the voltage and power a 555 timer circuit. However, ensure that the total voltage does not exceed the maximum voltage rating for the circuit.

5. What is the maximum current draw for a 555 timer circuit powered by a 9VDC battery?

The maximum current draw for a 555 timer circuit will depend on the specific components used and the duration of the circuit being powered. It is important to check the datasheets of the components to determine their maximum current ratings and ensure that the total current draw does not exceed the battery's capacity.

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