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Problem-Smallest radius of curvature

  1. Oct 30, 2006 #1
    I've been stuck on this for ages and would appreciate help on how to do it:

    On a train, the magnitude of the acceleration experienced by the passengers is limited to 0.050g.If the train is going round a curve at a speed of 220km/hr what's the smallest radius of curvature that the curve can have without exceeding the maximum allowed acceleration on the passengers.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 30, 2006 #2

    Doc Al

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    What have you done so far? Hint: What kind of acceleration is experienced when going around a curve?
     
  4. Oct 30, 2006 #3
    so far i've attempted to solve using v=r w
     
  5. Oct 30, 2006 #4

    Doc Al

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    Here's another hint: What have you learned about centripetal acceleration?
     
  6. Oct 30, 2006 #5
    em,in circular motion direction constantly changes.Centripetal acceleration is the resulting center directed acceleration.

    Do I need the formula: a=v^2/r ?
     
  7. Oct 30, 2006 #6

    Doc Al

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    Yes you do! :wink:

    When going around a curve, the acceleration is centripetal--that's what they are talking about in this problem.

    Be sure to convert everything to standard units before calculating the radius.
     
  8. Oct 30, 2006 #7
    I'm getting an answer of 74.42km for the radius.Does this sound about right to you?
     
  9. Oct 30, 2006 #8

    Doc Al

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    How did you arrive at that number?
     
  10. Oct 30, 2006 #9
    I said 0.050g=v^2/r (taking v to be 61m/s)
     
  11. Oct 30, 2006 #10

    Doc Al

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    You are forgetting to divide by g, which equals 9.8 m/s^2.
     
  12. Oct 30, 2006 #11
    Thanks for all your help!So should my equation be: v^2/r=(0.050)(9.80)
     
  13. Oct 30, 2006 #12

    Doc Al

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    That's right.
     
  14. Oct 30, 2006 #13

    OlderDan

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    That looks good. Solve the equation for r. You know v. Be careful with your units.
     
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