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Quiz me, please!

  1. Jan 5, 2005 #1
    Now, please give me 5 math problems and I'll solve them by next monday or ELSE!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 5, 2005 #2

    arildno

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    You really should give us some indication of what you know and are interested in.
    That would make it a bit easier for us to give you GOOD problems.
     
  4. Jan 5, 2005 #3
    I'm a 9th grade student who wants problems that is related to Newton's 2nd law
     
  5. Jan 5, 2005 #4
    Really! I'm telling you the truth and why would I lie? What would I gain from lying?
     
  6. Jan 5, 2005 #5

    arildno

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    I've never said you have lied (why do you think I did?).

    Ok, you're in 9th grade (I'm Norwegian, so I don't know exactly what that means in age (15-16?)):
    Since you ask about maths:
    Have you done a lot of calculus yet?
    (For example, max-min problems)
     
  7. Jan 5, 2005 #6
    No, I have not. I'm in Pre-algebra
     
  8. Jan 5, 2005 #7

    arildno

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    All right:
    Could you give a few words on which of the maths you have seen so far which seems both interesting and challenging?
     
  9. Jan 5, 2005 #8
    I've seen Area and everything before that.
     
  10. Jan 5, 2005 #9

    arildno

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    Okay, so you know quite a bit of geometry!

    Perhaps this is too easy for you, but:
    1) How do you prove the Pythagorean theorem?
    or:
    2) Give a reason (proof, if you like) that the sum of the angles in a triangle equals 180 degrees.
     
  11. Jan 5, 2005 #10

    dextercioby

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    And there's one i solved when i was 11.At the beginning of the 6-th grade,that.is
    Prove that in a plane the shortest distance between 2 points is given by the line segment that unites the two points.

    Daniel.
     
  12. Jan 5, 2005 #11
    I'm not in geomerty. Like inverse operations and 2 sqaured
     
  13. Jan 5, 2005 #12
    After all, this is a K-12 area, right?
     
  14. Jan 5, 2005 #13

    arildno

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    Do you see why this type of minimal statements from you (and your last one isn't much better) makes it very difficult for us to find suitable problems for you?
    We can't look into your mind, you MUST provide us with solid, detailed information of what you have actually worked with, and we'll give you good problems.

    When you say "2 squared" (that is [tex]2^{2}[/tex]) whatever type of problems are you referring to??

    It would be helpful if you post some actual problems you HAVE solved, and we'll give you more challenging ones along the same line.
     
  15. Jan 5, 2005 #14

    dextercioby

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    Seems to me,u don't know that many.How do you expect us to come up with problems,if u can't solve them...Restraining the curricula from which we should "invent" problems for you,makes us,actually me,to lose interest... :yuck:

    Daniel.

    PS.What do you mean no geometry??Didn't you take geometry from the 6th grade...?
     
  16. Jan 6, 2005 #15
    If you want more info, here it is.
    I know how to add, subtract, multiply, divde exponents.
    I know how to solve iverse operations, know how to simplify variable expressions
    I know mean, median, and mode. I know how to add, subtract, mulitiply, and divde decimals.(I have trouble with decimals so I would like more of these problems.
    Let’s start with this and please bear with me. This is the 1st time that I’ve ever been to a forum.
     
  17. Jan 6, 2005 #16
    Welcome to forum-life.

    I'm going to jump straight into giving you a problem involving area and pre-algebra.

    'If the length of a certain rectangle was decreased by 4 cm and the width was increased by 3 cm, a square with the same area as the original rectangle would be formed. What is the perimeter of the original rectangle?'

    Do you need something more challenging than this?
     
  18. Jan 6, 2005 #17

    DB

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    Here are 5 problems for you:

    1. [tex]\frac{(3a^{-4}b^4)^{-3}}{a^4b^{-2}}[/tex]

    2. [tex]\frac{(2x^3y^{-1})^{-1}*(9x^2y^4)^{\frac{1}{2}}}{(x^{-2}y)*(xy^5)}[/tex]

    Remember [tex]a^{-B}\equiv \frac{1}{a^B}[/tex]

    3. Knowing [tex]y=ax+b[/tex] Two coordinates (1,10) (2,14)
    Solve for "a" and "b" (slope and initial value)

    Hint: in case you haven't done this, use [tex]\frac{y_2-y_1}{x_2-x_1}[/tex]
    Remeber (x,y)

    4. [tex]2x+1200=-6x+600[/tex] Solve x

    5. Find the surface area of a sphere with diameter [tex]\sqrt{162722679.4}[/tex]
    Remember [tex]A_{surface,sphere}=4\pi r^2[/tex]

    Enjoy! :rolleyes:
    If you want the answers you can send me a private message of just post them on your thread. Good luck!
     
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