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Rotation of mass

  1. Apr 17, 2007 #1
    Dear friends,
    I am new to this forum , and I've just joined. I would like to ask a specific query reg. the rotation of mass. I need to rotate a mass from its center axes.So i would like some of you to guide me , how to proceed in this matter.Rotation by a drive mechanism , so that the load may be rotated by 180 to 360 deg. Pl. help me out. Thanks is advance.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 18, 2007 #2

    Danger

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    Gold Member

    Welcome to PF, Charles.
    I'm afraid that you'll have to provide more information; your question is incomplete.
    First, are you asking how to determine the centre of mass, or advice on a mechanism to rotate it?
     
  4. Apr 18, 2007 #3

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    If you're looking for a way to rotate something, you can consider using a stepper motor:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stepper_motor
     
  5. Apr 19, 2007 #4
    Thanks

    Dear friends,

    Thanks for your quick reply. In continuation with my query , I need to rotate a mass of nearly 10 tonne about its centre axis , and the component is a fabricated rectangular structure.Its got a bore and I'm planning to use the same , using a shaft and rotate it.
     
  6. Apr 19, 2007 #5

    FredGarvin

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    Science Advisor

    Are we to assume that you have a way to get this on the shaft and that you just need a drive mechanism? You could do this with industrial strength belts and motors. What are the dimensions of this piece?
     
  7. Apr 19, 2007 #6

    Danger

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    Gold Member

    This is indeed on a considerably different scale than I was thinking of. Are you able to post a diagram?
     
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