Ship called the CXV (Crew Transfer Vehicle)

In summary, the CXV is a Crew Transfer Vehicle being developed by t/Space. It is based on the Discoverer capsule and is intended to replace the space shuttle as the means of transporting crews to the space station. It is being developed by Lockheed-Martin and may eventually be manufactured by Boeing.
  • #1
Flyboy
211
250
I read an article in Popular Science about a ship called the CXV (Crew Transfer Vehicle).:confused: It is made by a company called t/Space. I was wondering if anyone knew anything about it. Any help is welcome.
 
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  • #2
I understand that t/space is working on the project, but they will not make it. Lockheed or Boeing will manufacture it. I believe they want it to replace the space shuttle for transporting crews to the space station. I read somewhere that it can be launched from a carrier by booster rockets, and it is based on the discoverer capsule.

carp
PropulsionAccess.com
 
  • #3
Hey Carp. I just noticed your sig and took a look at that site. I will definitely be checking that out more closely.
 
  • #4
thanks
I'm trying to get some people to start sharing ideas over there b/c rocket engines/jet engines are my thing.

carp
PropulsionAccess.com
 
  • #5
Mine too...Are you in the business too or an enthusiast?
 
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  • #6
Almost in the business...I'm a mechanical engineering student (not long until graduation). I'm trying to make connections in the propulsion field and learn everything I can.

carp
PropulsionAccess.com
 
  • #7
Well, this the right forum here at PF.

Rocketdyne (now part of UTC's Pratt & Whitney Division) is major rocket motor manfuacturer.
http://www.pw.utc.com/prod_space.asp

ATK is a supplier of solid rockets.
http://www.atk.com/RocketMotors/rocketmotors_intro.asp

Aerojet is a supplier of solid and liquid rocket motors.
http://www.aerojet.com/capabilities/index.php
 
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  • #8
Flyboy said:
I read an article in Popular Science about a ship called the CXV (Crew Transfer Vehicle).:confused: It is made by a company called t/Space. I was wondering if anyone knew anything about it. Any help is welcome.
This is t/space's site - http://www.transformspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=projects.view&workid=CCD3097A-96B6-175C-97F15F270F2B83AA

t/space was one of several companies to provide concepts for future exploration - http://www.nasa.gov/missions/solarsystem/vision_concepts.html
On Sept. 1, 2004, NASA tapped 11 companies (list at left) to conduct preliminary concept studies for human lunar exploration and the development of the crew exploration vehicle.

I believe Lockheed-Martin got the CEV contract, so I don't know if t/space has funding from NASA or other sources.

Interesting article - NASA Internal Memo From Constellation Program Manager Jeff Hanley
http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=22553
 
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  • #9
carp said:
it is based on the discoverer capsule.
I am curious what the Discoverer capsules are.:confused: I remeber hearing of the Corona series of spy satellites that used photographic film returned to Earth in a reentry capsule and were recovered in midair under a parachute. Are Discoverer and Corona the same capsule?:confused:
 
  • #11
carp said:
I understand that t/space is working on the project, but they will not make it. Lockheed or Boeing will manufacture it. I believe they want it to replace the space shuttle for transporting crews to the space station. I read somewhere that it can be launched from a carrier by booster rockets, and it is based on the discoverer capsule.

carp
PropulsionAccess.com

It is also being built from the design phase up with the intention that it should be upgradable for trips to the Moon and eventually Mars.
 

Related to Ship called the CXV (Crew Transfer Vehicle)

What is the purpose of a Crew Transfer Vehicle?

A Crew Transfer Vehicle (CXV) is designed to transport astronauts and supplies to and from a space station. It serves as a vital link between Earth and the space station, allowing for crew rotation and resupply missions.

How is the CXV different from other spacecrafts?

The CXV is specifically designed for crew transfer missions, while other spacecrafts may have different purposes such as satellite launches or deep space exploration. The CXV is also designed to be reusable, unlike some other spacecrafts that are only used for one mission.

What are the key components of the CXV?

The CXV typically consists of a crew module, a service module, and a propulsion system. The crew module is where the astronauts live and work during the mission, while the service module contains the spacecraft's propulsion, power, and life support systems.

How long does it take for a CXV to reach a space station?

The exact time it takes for a CXV to reach a space station varies depending on the distance between the two and the specific mission trajectory. However, on average, it takes about 2-3 days for a CXV to reach a space station in low Earth orbit.

What safety measures are in place for the CXV?

The CXV undergoes rigorous testing and safety checks before each mission, including simulations and inspections to ensure the spacecraft is in optimal condition. In addition, the CXV is equipped with emergency systems and escape procedures in case of any unforeseen issues during the mission.

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