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Shock waves in crystals - temperature effect

  1. Dec 3, 2009 #1
    If you induce a shock wave in a covalent crystal using an ultrashort laser pulse, is there any way to estimate the temperature rise in relation to the pressure? Say I want to induce pressures of 10's of GPa. Is there a general way to think of this problem? I know next to nothing about shock waves.
    Thanks.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 4, 2009 #2

    Mech_Engineer

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    If you know next to nothing about shock waves, what business do you have in shocking a material with an ultrashort laser pulse?
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2009
  4. Dec 4, 2009 #3
    If you're not going to provide any information, what business do you have posting in the thread?

    But hey, if you really need an outlet to be condescending, go right ahead.

    Anyway, I'll have you know that I wasn't intending to start inducing shocks in my lab's photodetector until I'd at LEAST read the wikipedia article.
     
  5. Dec 4, 2009 #4

    Mech_Engineer

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    Look, I work in the field of shock physics diagnostics, so I have at least a gross concept of what you're trying to do. Quit getting defensive over a valid question.

    What is it you're trying to accomplish in these experiments? It is possible to calculate the temperature given the proper diagnostics, but do you have a concept of how fast the shock is going to be and what kind of equipment you're going to use to measure the shock?

    So, you're going to design a shock physics experiment based on a (non existent) shock physics article on Wikipedia? You'd better get a proper text book on the subject first.
     
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