Shock waves in crystals - temperature effect

In summary, the conversation is about inducing a shock wave in a covalent crystal using an ultrashort laser pulse and estimating the resulting temperature rise in relation to pressure. The person asking the question is not knowledgeable about shock waves and is looking for a general understanding of the problem. The other person is questioning the validity of the experiment and suggesting getting proper knowledge on the subject before proceeding.
  • #1
johng23
294
1
If you induce a shock wave in a covalent crystal using an ultrashort laser pulse, is there any way to estimate the temperature rise in relation to the pressure? Say I want to induce pressures of 10's of GPa. Is there a general way to think of this problem? I know next to nothing about shock waves.
Thanks.
 
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  • #2
If you know next to nothing about shock waves, what business do you have in shocking a material with an ultrashort laser pulse?
 
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  • #3
If you're not going to provide any information, what business do you have posting in the thread?

But hey, if you really need an outlet to be condescending, go right ahead.

Anyway, I'll have you know that I wasn't intending to start inducing shocks in my lab's photodetector until I'd at LEAST read the wikipedia article.
 
  • #4
johng23 said:
If you're not going to provide any information, what business do you have posting in the thread?

But hey, if you really need an outlet to be condescending, go right ahead.

Look, I work in the field of shock physics diagnostics, so I have at least a gross concept of what you're trying to do. Quit getting defensive over a valid question.

What is it you're trying to accomplish in these experiments? It is possible to calculate the temperature given the proper diagnostics, but do you have a concept of how fast the shock is going to be and what kind of equipment you're going to use to measure the shock?

johng23 said:
Anyway, I'll have you know that I wasn't intending to start inducing shocks in my lab's photodetector until I'd at LEAST read the wikipedia article.

So, you're going to design a shock physics experiment based on a (non existent) shock physics article on Wikipedia? You'd better get a proper textbook on the subject first.
 

Related to Shock waves in crystals - temperature effect

1. What are shock waves in crystals?

Shock waves in crystals refer to the sudden and rapid increase in pressure and temperature within a crystal structure, caused by an external force such as an impact or explosion. This phenomenon is also known as shock compression.

2. How do shock waves affect the temperature of crystals?

Shock waves cause a sudden increase in temperature within crystals due to the compression of the crystal lattice. This increase in temperature can be significant, reaching thousands of degrees within a few nanoseconds.

3. What factors influence the temperature effect of shock waves in crystals?

The temperature effect of shock waves in crystals is influenced by various factors such as the intensity and duration of the shock wave, the crystal structure and composition, and the initial temperature of the crystal before the shock wave occurs.

4. What are the applications of studying shock waves in crystals?

Studying shock waves in crystals is crucial for understanding the behavior of materials under extreme conditions, such as those found in explosions and impacts. This knowledge can be applied in various fields, including materials science, geophysics, and defense technology.

5. How do scientists study the temperature effect of shock waves in crystals?

Scientists study the temperature effect of shock waves in crystals through experiments using high-speed cameras, x-ray diffraction, and other techniques to capture and analyze the changes in the crystal structure and temperature. Computer simulations are also used to model and predict the behavior of shock waves in crystals.

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