Sound Waves of earthquake

In summary, when an earthquake occurs, two types of sound waves are generated and travel through the earth, with the primary wave having a speed of about 8.0 km/s and the secondary wave having a speed of about 4.5 km/s. A seismograph records the arrival of the P wave and then, 88.7 s later, records the arrival of the S wave. By writing equations for the time and distance for each wave, and using a kinematics approach, the distance between the seismograph and the earthquake can be determined.
  • #1
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When an earthquake occurs, two types of sound waves are generated and travel through the earth. The primary, or P, wave has a speed of about 8.0 km/s and the secondary, or S, wave has a speed of about 4.5 km/s. A seismograph, located some distance away, records the arrival of the P wave and then, 88.7 s later, records the arrival of the S wave. Assuming that the waves travel in a straight line, how far (in terms of m) is the seismograph from the earthquake?

I really don't know how to approach this problem

We skipped around chapter wise and I think I'm missing some important information from previous chapters regarding this problem.

The only logical equation that I think might be applicable to this problem is v = sqrt(ykT/M). Are there some crucial givens that I'm over looking?


I really just need some hints as to how to approach this problem

Thanks a lot
 
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  • #2
The waves both travel the same distance, but in different times. Write the equations relating the time to the distance for each wave and solve each one for t. Subtract to get an equation for the time difference.
 
  • #3
Perhaps a simple kinematics equations approach is what you are looking for. No use in complicating things. Thats all it really is.
 
  • #4
I got it :)
 
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1. What are sound waves of an earthquake?

Sound waves of an earthquake are vibrations that travel through the Earth's surface and air as a result of the energy released during an earthquake. They are a type of seismic wave and can be detected by seismometers.

2. How do sound waves of an earthquake differ from other seismic waves?

Sound waves of an earthquake are a type of surface wave, meaning they travel along the Earth's surface, while other seismic waves, such as P-waves and S-waves, travel through the Earth's interior. Sound waves also have a lower frequency and longer wavelength compared to other seismic waves.

3. How are sound waves of an earthquake measured?

Scientists use seismometers to measure the amplitude and frequency of sound waves generated by an earthquake. These measurements can help determine the magnitude and location of an earthquake.

4. Can sound waves of an earthquake cause damage?

While sound waves of an earthquake may not directly cause damage, they can amplify the effects of an earthquake by causing buildings and other structures to vibrate. This can lead to structural damage and collapse in severe cases.

5. Can sound waves of an earthquake be predicted?

Currently, it is not possible to predict the exact occurrence of sound waves during an earthquake. However, scientists can analyze data from previous earthquakes to make predictions about the likelihood and intensity of sound waves in the future.

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