Stress in steel brackets

In summary, the software calculates the tension force resulting from the wire and includes a fixing method so that it can be used with a circular plate. The sketch attached shows the direction of the tension force applied.
  • #1
4
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TL;DR Summary
Plate with hole help
Hi,

I have developed a catenary software that calculates the tension force resulting from the wire and now I am working on suitable fixing methods and including the option for this within the software.

Has anyone got any guidance on working out the stresses applied on the attached applications? Also how woudl the circular plate act if there were multiple wires pulling in different directions?

I have done a quick mock up for a plate with multiple holes, but this isn`t really applicable to these applciations given the holes are positioned close to the edge of the plates.

Any help will be appreciated
 

Attachments

  • Example A.jpg
    Example A.jpg
    20 KB · Views: 84
  • Example B.jpg
    Example B.jpg
    26.7 KB · Views: 71
  • Example C.jpg
    Example C.jpg
    19.6 KB · Views: 78
Last edited:
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  • #2
Welcome!
It is difficult for me to make sense of the wires you mention and the three attached drawings.
Could you explain the assembly a little more?
Thank you.
 
  • #3
Hello,

Thank you for your reply.

I have attached an image of an example of the mounting arrangement. Basically a Dee shackle fits through the hole in the plate and then the turnbuckle with the centenary wire is fitted to the shackle.

Thanks
 

Attachments

  • Catenary Mounting Arrangement.jpg
    Catenary Mounting Arrangement.jpg
    12.3 KB · Views: 69
  • Example Mounting.jpg
    Example Mounting.jpg
    21.7 KB · Views: 65
  • #4
Sorry, I am still lost; perhaps another member will be able to help.
 
  • #5
Thanks anyway.

I have attached another sketch which shows the direction of the tension force applied.

Say as an arbitrary force of 1kN applied in all directions?
 

Attachments

  • Example A Force Direction.jpg
    Example A Force Direction.jpg
    22.6 KB · Views: 63
  • Example B Force Direction.jpg
    Example B Force Direction.jpg
    30.6 KB · Views: 60
  • Example C Force Direction.jpg
    Example C Force Direction.jpg
    20.2 KB · Views: 67
  • #6
Several cases need to be calculated when designing brackets. For the region around the attachment holes, the following need to be calculated:
1) Bolt shear
2) Compressive failure in bracket
3) Shear failure in bracket
4) Tension failure in bracket

The rest of the bracket is complex. The following quote from my copy of Manual of Steel Construction, 9th Edition illustrates the point:

The actual distribution of stress in the tee flange or angle leg and the extent of prying action are extremely complex. ... Good correlation between estimated connection strength and observed test results has been obtained using theory of Ref. 1. Design and analysis procedures based on this theory have been developed in Refs. 2 and 3.

I recommend that you study the CE Machinery Directive and applicable codes relevant to steel construction in your country. The codes have standard procedures for designing connections that result in safe connections. Those standard procedures have been tested and are proven to work. Trying to do your own analysis is what we call "reinventing the wheel", and can lead to unsafe results.
 

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