Temperature increase in filament due to resistance

  • Thread starter protargol
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Main Question or Discussion Point

I'm trying to calculate the temperature increase in a filament which a pass a current through. It's a very fine wire, so making direct measurements is difficult. Also, it's stainless steel 310 instead of a standard material. I can adjust the current, but want to correlate how the power dissipated through it correlates to a temperature increase relative to the ambient air.

So I know the Power from P=I^2*R, but how can I correlate the thermal properties to a temperature increase relative to ambient? Also, I only care about the steady state. Any tips? Thanks.

So I guess a big component to this is how much does convention play a part and how much radiation plays a role?
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
vk6kro
Science Advisor
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If you know the resistance of the material at room temperature (from E/I) and the resistance at your unknown temperature (from E/I), and since you know the material, then you can work out the average temperature of the wire .

You should be able to look up the resistivity of the wire material.
 

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