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The Gravitational Field

  1. Sep 10, 2011 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    2uicc2f.jpg

    2. Relevant equations
    jt3x4l.jpg

    3. The attempt at a solution
    347xvnn.jpg

    But as you can see, when I typed the answer on the answer column, the computer marked it as wrong. Please point out my mistake in 24 hours. Thank you.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2011
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 10, 2011 #2

    lewando

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    What is the distance between M and O?
     
  4. Sep 10, 2011 #3
    By simple Pythagorean theorem you can work it out to l^2 sqrt{2}
     
  5. Sep 10, 2011 #4

    lewando

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    I get something different. Since the clock is ticking, how about
    [tex]l \sqrt{2}[/tex]
     
  6. Sep 10, 2011 #5
    I was writing the distance squared. So basically our answer for that is same.
     
  7. Sep 10, 2011 #6

    lewando

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    Ahh.. nevermind me, I thought I saw it... standby please.
     
  8. Sep 10, 2011 #7
    I think my answer is correct and the computer is wrong.
     
  9. Sep 10, 2011 #8

    lewando

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    How about your last step? The answer you gave was the common coefficient of i and j. But to get the magnitude should you not take the root of sum of the squares of these coefficients?
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2011
  10. Sep 10, 2011 #9
    Use more sets of parentheses at the beginning.
     
  11. Sep 12, 2011 #10
    Enlighten me.
     
  12. Sep 12, 2011 #11

    Hootenanny

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    What is the magnitude of the vector [itex]\boldsymbol{x} = \boldsymbol{i}+\boldsymbol{j} = [1,1]^\text{T}[/itex]?
     
  13. Sep 12, 2011 #12
    When something is in the form Constant * ( i + j ) and you would like to find the magnitude of that

    use abs ( Constant * ( i+j) ) = Abs(Constant ) * Abs(i+j)

    what is Abs ( i + j ) ?

    How would you interpret it ?
     
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