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Thermodynamics -- hydrostatics question

  1. Dec 2, 2015 #1
    • Poster has been reminded that they need to use the Homework Help Template, and show their efforts on their schoolwork
    Good afternoon. You are a student of the career of physical im 'm like someone aids with the second section (II) the following problem because I do not understand much.

    Thank you very much.
    Problem:
    Considering that the effects of pressure variation with height are due only factor hydrostatic (dp/dz =(rho)g)), say what is the end of a mass of an ideal gas diatomic when quasiestàticament up the atmosphere from an initial state? (Z1, T1, p1 )up to a certain height Z2. Do the calculation for two different cases:
    (i) assuming that the process is adiabatic (check in this case what value it has, itself, the variation of temperature with height);
    (ii) in the case where the gas entropy wins in proportion to the height trail, ds = (alpha)dz.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 2, 2015 #2

    Ken G

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    Gold Member

    You need to use ds = alpha dz to get P as a function of rho, and then just solve for the differential equation in rho(z). It will help that the ideal gas connection between entropy and P/rho is dq/ds = (P * m) / (rho * k), right? Here dq is the heat added, so dq = du - P*m/rho2 drho, and u=5/2 * P * m / (rho * k) for a diatomic gas. Notice that I've avoided using T anywhere, as it plays no explicit role and is just being substituted away. The goal is to get one differential equation that gives you dP/drho as a function of P and rho, and another that gives you dP/dz as a function of rho, and eliminate P. You can always set alpha=0 at the end to get part (i).
     
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