Troubleshooting Malfunctioning Device

In summary, the conversation discusses the possible dangers of getting a bruise from falling and how to take care of it.
  • #1
wolram
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I am sure it is not right, it seems able to go backwards far more than the other, and has less control, it has little pain until it goes backwards, the only outward sign of malfunction is that it is quite hot ? is this a doctor thing or wait and see thing?
 
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  • #2
Have you done anything recently to damage it? When you say 'backwards', do you mean beyond the point of straight-leggedness?

If you've damaged it today get some ice and compression on it, keep it up, and perhaps have a couple of ibuprofen. See how it goes tomorrow, and providing it's not an A&E job you'll know after tomorrow if it's a trip to the docs/physio.
 
  • #3
I fell on it tother day and it goes way beyond straight, and now the blasted thing seems much bigger than the other.:grumpy:
 
  • #4
Now i have a bruise that seems to be getting bigger by the hour :grumpy: :grumpy:
 
  • #5
I've got two of those, Woolie! Years of working on concrete floors earned me arthroscopic surgery on both and arthritis. I'm in my mid-50's and can be very crippled up when exposed to fragrances. It flares up my immune system and makes my joints so painful that it is difficult to walk. Do not go to a chiropractor or an osteopathic doctor if you are seeking pain relief. See a real doctor and pursue therapy and healthy supplementation instead of drugs. Pain-killers just numb you to additional damage that you are doing to your joints.
 
  • #6
turbo-1 said:
I've got two of those, Woolie! Years of working on concrete floors earned me arthroscopic surgery on both and arthritis. I'm in my mid-50's and can be very crippled up when exposed to fragrances. It flares up my immune system and makes my joints so painful that it is difficult to walk. Do not go to a chiropractor or an osteopathic doctor if you are seeking pain relief. See a real doctor and pursue therapy and healthy supplementation instead of drugs. Pain-killers just numb you to additional damage that you are doing to your joints.

Aww, sorry Turbo, that must be rough, i would not bother anyone except for this bruise getting bigger.
 
  • #7
Hey Turbo, have you tried hydro therapy i just remembered it is supposed to be very good.
 
  • #8
wolram said:
Aww, sorry Turbo, that must be rough, i would not bother anyone except for this bruise getting bigger.
That's not good, go to a doctor, that might be bleeding causing the "bruise". If you get a blood clot and it goes into your circulatory system, it could kill you.
 
  • #9
Evo said:
That's not good, go to a doctor, that might be bleeding causing the "bruise". If you get a blood clot and it goes into your circulatory system, it could kill you.

er, sweetie... ALL bruises are caused by bleeding... :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

Go to the doctor, Wollie. Especially if it's hot and swollen. Sounds like it could be a joint effusion. Don't wait. Go now. I'm not saying you're in danger, but the sooner you take care of the problem, the better and easier it will heal.
 
  • #10
Take Tsu's advice and see your doctor. Hot, swollen, and bending directions normal knees aren't supposed to bend is not a good sign. You could have torn a ligament in your fall, and even if it's just a sprain, you should get it properly bandaged so you don't cause more damage to yourself walking around on it.
 
  • #11
Tsu said:
er, sweetie... ALL bruises are caused by bleeding... :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
I know. but he said it's increasing, that means it's still bleeding and that's not normal, it's not just a "bruise". :grumpy:
 
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  • #12
Definitely doctor time, Woolie. Knees are one of the worst places for an injury, because they just don't heal on their own. Even a relatively minor problem like a sprain is stressed so much during everyday activity that there just isn't an opportunity for healing to set in properly. What you describe sounds very much like what happened when I tore the tendon in my left knee back in grade 10. It has never healed, and never will, and was the 'nucleation' site for the arthritis that currently inhabits every part of my body. Don't take any chances.
Was this a result of the 'haunting' when you said that you missed a stair? My injury was a result of falling to my knees with a load of books when someone ran into me on ice in the parking lot. The first sign of something being wrong (other than the pain) was when I pulled up my pant leg and found my kneecap 2 inches higher than its normal location.
 
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  • #13
Tsu said:
er, sweetie... ALL bruises are caused by bleeding... :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

Go to the doctor, Wollie. Especially if it's hot and swollen. Sounds like it could be a joint effusion. Don't wait. Go now. I'm not saying you're in danger, but the sooner you take care of the problem, the better and easier it will heal.
Meh! Be a man, Wollie! Wrap it up in an ace bandage and use ice on it at night!

Fine print:
Okay, actually that worked for about a week (which was good enough - I had a couple of big games coming up). After that, I didn't play soccer for about two months and it took longer than that for my knee to really recover 100%. But, on the bright side, by the end of it all, I could shoot with my left foot even better than with my right foot.

Finer print:
You realize this advice is given by the same guy that suggested rigging a circuit in your pants designed to deliver electric shocks would be an effective way to discourage females from pinching your butt, don't you?
 
  • #14
BobG said:
You realize this advice is given by the same guy that suggested rigging a circuit in your pants designed to deliver electric shocks would be an effective way to discourage females from pinching your butt, don't you?
Is this a modification of the 'electro-ejaculator'? Do you just reverse the polarity, or what? :confused:
 
  • #15
Danger said:
Is this a modification of the 'electro-ejaculator'? Do you just reverse the polarity, or what? :confused:
No! It's based on the same idea of those novelty books that lure someone to open them with a provocative title but deliver an electric shock as soon as the book is opened.

You charge a capacitor with a battery and the pinching woman provides the discharge path when she touches the pinchee's pants.

I thought it was a great idea! As long as you don't spill anything on yourself, of course.
 
  • #16
wolram said:
Hey Turbo, have you tried hydro therapy i just remembered it is supposed to be very good.
No, it is not safe for me to spend long periods in enclosed spaces that are open to the public. Even "unscented" Oil of Olay moisturizing lotion is so loaded with fragrances (masking fragrances) that it causes a severe reaction (migraine, congested lungs, and very painful arthritis flare-ups, not to mention extremely high blood pressure - once it got to 208 over 90, making me just a little bit nervous about aneurysms). Friday, I had to go to the lab at the local hospital to give them a blood sample for my upcoming physical. I was there for about 15 minutes, and though I didn't smell any strong perfumes or fragrances, I was in pain (joints) and in respiratory distress for most of Saturday, as well.
 
  • #17
Reminscent of one of the weapons that I designed. Thin coats of latex on my hands, with transparent conductive paint strips along both sides of the fingers... hooked to a Taser circuit. The problem is to make damned sure that my uninsulated parts don't come into contact with the subject.
(And masturbation is not recommended. )
 
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  • #18
turbo-1 said:
No, it is not safe for me to spend long periods in enclosed spaces that are open to the public. Even "unscented" Oil of Olay moisturizing lotion is so loaded with fragrances (masking fragrances) that it causes a severe reaction (migraine, congested lungs, and very painful arthritis flare-ups, not to mention extremely high blood pressure - once it got to 208 over 90, making me just a little bit nervous about aneurysms). Friday, I had to go to the lab at the local hospital to give them a blood sample for my upcoming physical. I was there for about 15 minutes, and though I didn't smell any strong perfumes or fragrances, I was in pain (joints) and in respiratory distress for most of Saturday, as well.

That is a double dose of rotten Turbo , my problem seems nothing now,
anyway guys, i think it is ok stiff (shut up Danger):tongue2: but the bruise stopped spreading, and it feels ok walking, and it is only slightly painful
whilst it has been still for a time.
 
  • #19
wolram said:
(shut up Danger)
You do realize how irritating pre-emptive strikes are, don't you? :grumpy:
 
  • #20
wolram said:
That is a double dose of rotten Turbo , my problem seems nothing now,
anyway guys, i think it is ok stiff (shut up Danger):tongue2: but the bruise stopped spreading, and it feels ok walking, and it is only slightly painful
whilst it has been still for a time.
Try to stay off of it as much as possible for the next week or two, knees can be tricky. After my knee incident, it clicks when I go up and down stairs and sitting in an odd position can make it hurt.
 
  • #21
Evo said:
sitting in an odd position can make it hurt.
Doing what in an odd position?
 
  • #22
Danger said:
Definitely doctor time, Woolie. Knees are one of the worst places for an injury, because they just don't heal on their own. Even a relatively minor problem like a sprain is stressed so much during everyday activity that there just isn't an opportunity for healing to set in properly. What you describe sounds very much like what happened when I tore the tendon in my left knee back in grade 10. It has never healed, and never will, and was the 'nucleation' site for the arthritis that currently inhabits every part of my body. Don't take any chances.
Was this a result of the 'haunting' when you said that you missed a stair? My injury was a result of falling to my knees with a load of books when someone ran into me on ice in the parking lot. The first sign of something being wrong (other than the pain) was when I pulled up my pant leg and found my kneecap 2 inches higher than its normal location.

Yes it was the being startled and missing the top step, can your knee still
go beyond vertical? mine can, and that does hurt.
were you hit by a car? and do you mean your arthritis *spread* from one
injury, i thought it came about from worn out joints.
 
  • #23
Evo said:
Try to stay off of it as much as possible for the next week or two, knees can be tricky. After my knee incident, it clicks when I go up and down stairs and sitting in an odd position can make it hurt.

You (DO), (NEED), looking after, pity that pond is so big :grumpy:
 
  • #24
Woolie, I wasn't hit by a car. It was a friend who came running up to greet me and slipped on the ice. Took me down like a ten-pin. I was used to just dropping to my knees in front of the TV to change channels or volume (way pre-remote/pre-colour days), so I didn't bother trying to break my fall. I probably would have been okay except for that extra 30 lbs. of books.
Arthritis usually sets in at an injury site, then spreads. (My kind, at least.) It appears to be an auto-immune disease. I guess that's a trade-off for never getting sick. My immune system is so good that it attacks me. On the other hand, I've survived things that should have killed me a dozen times over because of that system. I could probably eat an entire herd of cattle with mad cow disease and have nothing other than mild heartburn to show for it. (Of course, my brain is porous enough already that it might be hard to tell.)
 
  • #25
Danger said:
It appears to be an auto-immune disease. I guess that's a trade-off for never getting sick. My immune system is so good that it attacks me.
I can relate to that. My immune system is set to a hair trigger, so though I don't get colds, flu, etc very often, just a few breaths of air with fragrances in it can send me spiraling into a couple of days of pain and discomfort. When I went to the ER after a particularly bad exposure, the triage nurse rushed me in without asking to see any ID, insurance card, or anything. I can just imagine how bad I must have looked to justify that response. That's the day my BP was 208/90 and my hands were purple. I was freezing because my body was shutting down circulation to the extremities to keep the vital stuff operating.
 
  • #26
Wow! I'm allergic to dust, vinegar and crustaceans, but nothing else. My late cousin was a psychiatrist specializing in 'environmental medicine', though, and a lot of his patients were similar to you. His funeral notice, in fact, specifically requested that no attendees wear purfume, after-shave, etc. in order to address that problem. (This is not in any way intended to imply that you're nuts; those patients were considered to have psychological problems until he discovered that most of them were based upon physical irritants.)
 
  • #27
turbo-1 said:
I can relate to that. My immune system is set to a hair trigger, so though I don't get colds, flu, etc very often, just a few breaths of air with fragrances in it can send me spiraling into a couple of days of pain and discomfort. When I went to the ER after a particularly bad exposure, the triage nurse rushed me in without asking to see any ID, insurance card, or anything. I can just imagine how bad I must have looked to justify that response. That's the day my BP was 208/90 and my hands were purple. I was freezing because my body was shutting down circulation to the extremities to keep the vital stuff operating.


Do you live in a city or town Turbo? would country air be better for you?
would country smells affect you?

I think i am immune to stuff like Danger, a couple of time people have come down with food poisoning, and i ate the same as them with no ill effects.
 
  • #28
wolram said:
Do you live in a city or town Turbo? would country air be better for you?
would country smells affect you?

I think i am immune to stuff like Danger, a couple of time people have come down with food poisoning, and i ate the same as them with no ill effects.
My wife an I live in a a little log cabin out in the country. We moved here in part to get away from the suburbs, where the fabric-softener fragrances coming out of clothes-dryer vents would plague me. I have no problems with dust, gasoline, flowers, pollen, and only slight allergies to cats and dogs. The problem with perfumes and fragrances started when I was working as an optician (several of the doctors' assistants wore very strong fragrances), so I got a different job, which worked out OK until the boss gave me his girlfriend as an assistant, and she came to work loaded with cosmetics every day. Constant exposure to her got me to the point I'm at today, and years after being able to steer clear of her, my immune system still will not settle down.

My nephew came to visit today (he's going through a tough time with his parents) and because of the fragrance in his clothes (fabric-softener probably) I had to dash out of the house. I grabbed my chain saw and cleared some trees downed by last week's storm, hauled out the wood with my ATV, stacked it, went to buy gas at an automated pump, got my wood splitter under cover, etc, etc to give him time to visit with his favorite aunt (my wife) and I didn't go back inside the house until she had had the windows open for a good long time. A few months ago, I had to ask my 80 year-old father to leave after he had come down to eat a lunch with us, because he had washed his clothes in the Regular version of the laundry detergent that he accidentally bought (instead of the fragrance-free version he had been using). That sucked! We both felt horrible! I felt bad asking him to leave and he was feeling really ashamed for making me sick.
 
  • #29
Well, you're better off than me in that regard. My mother makes me sick every time that I talk to her, and she does it on purpose. Just turned 94 on Saturday, and you can't kill her with a stick. She still lives by herself (well, I left my cat there to keep her company) in the house that she was born in. A pit-bull with false teeth. :rolleyes:
 
  • #30
That's awful turbo! Strong perfumes can give me a headache if I'm around them too long, but nothing like you describe (and it goes away quickly once I get to fresh air).

Is there some common chemical in a lot of fragrances that would explain this sensitivity to all of them? You're certainly not the first person I've heard of who had severe allergic reactions to fragrance. I used to know someone (one of my dad's former customers) who couldn't go to a mall because there was no way in the door without someone trying to spray perfume at you (even though they now ask before spraying, it's still in the air and really strong right at the entrances to every department store) and it would trigger a severe asthma attack for her...the kind that landed her in the hospital.

You never even would know when to expect it sometimes. I really hate when they hide a fragrance sample in something mailed to you. I don't really need fragrance samples in my credit card statements. :yuck: I've had to call and ask them not to put any of that stuff in with the statements, because it really quickly starts to give me a headache.

But not every fragrance bothers me, like some fabric softeners are okay, but not others. That's what makes me wonder if there's a common chemical in many of them that is the real trigger.

Oh, yeah, and the last place I worked, we had this one emeritus professor there whose wife smelled like she bathed in cheap perfume. :yuck: Everyone knew if she was in the building. For a while, his office was near mine, and it got to be unbearable to have that odor wafting to my office. Fortunately, pretty much everyone had the same opinion of her perfume, so they understood when I told them I had to leave early because I couldn't bear to be in my office with that strong of perfume wafting in.

My father was also sensitive to perfumes and would get very ill around them. My grandmother was so used to not wearing perfume around him that she wouldn't even put it on to go to his funeral (she liked to wear perfume, so except when she was visiting us, it was habit for her to put on a little).
 
  • #31
I am getting more sensitive too perfumes as I get older. I take my time choosing a seat in the lecture hall when we have exams because it can be really distracting to breathe in the competing mixture of all the body sprays these young undergrads are so fond of.
 
  • #32
Math Is Hard said:
I am getting more sensitive too perfumes as I get older. I take my time choosing a seat in the lecture hall when we have exams because it can be really distracting to breathe in the competing mixture of all the body sprays these young undergrads are so fond of.
I don't know if I'm getting more sensitive, or they're just wearing so much more fragrance. I don't remember any of the guys bothering with colognes when I was in college unless they were getting ready to go out at night (and even then, that was only some of them). Now, it seems they all wear some sort of cologne every day. :yuck: Did I just not notice it before, or were they more subtle scents, or are they really wearing more cologne? And, yeah, body sprays...my sister is one of those people who buys all these things, and seems to think I enjoy them too. She got me this whole set of scented body scrub and lotion and bubble bath and body spray for my birthday. I decided I'd try the body scrub stuff, because being in the shower, I could quickly wash it off if the scent was awful. I kid you not, it smelled like exhaust fumes to me! :yuck: And I couldn't get the smell back off me, and it was just the tiniest dab I had put in my hands to start with. I had the same sort of headache that day as if I was driving behind a stinky bus on my way to work. :yuck: Who comes up with these scents, and why does anyone think they should wear them?
 
  • #33
After hearing about people's troubles on here with anything from perfumes to MSG, I feel really lucky for not having any sort of intense alergies... :bugeye:

EDIT: Hopefully nothing horrible will come later in life though...
 
  • #34
moose said:
After hearing about people's troubles on here with anything from perfumes to MSG, I feel really lucky for not having any sort of intense alergies... :bugeye:

EDIT: Hopefully nothing horrible will come later in life though...
I have extreme physiological responses to MSG and fragrances, and they both started showing up (at least in some form) at about the age of 40. My mother died of respiratory collapse at age 49 with similar problems. I cannot understand while people will allow their children's food and air to be contaminated with this crap, especially in the face of "unusual" increases in ADD and asthma. Does everybody need to smell of "cedar", "fresh mountain scent", "floral glades", etc? It's all made from chemicals, folks!
 
  • #35
turbo-1 said:
I have extreme physiological responses to MSG and fragrances, and they both started showing up (at least in some form) at about the age of 40. My mother died of respiratory collapse at age 49 with similar problems. I cannot understand while people will allow their children's food and air to be contaminated with this crap, especially in the face of "unusual" increases in ADD and asthma. Does everybody need to smell of "cedar", "fresh mountain scent", "floral glades", etc? It's all made from chemicals, folks!
I don't get it either. They banned things like peanuts from planes for a while when it's really rare for someone to have an allergic reaction just from sitting next to peanuts, yet perfumes are everywhere. In my case, I don't think it's an allergy, but more a sensitivity. Oh, I used to have to leave the building when I worked in one lab because the cleaning supplies the custodians used would make me sick too. I can understand needing to use strong disinfectants, especially in public restrooms, but is it necessary to scent them with strong perfumes?

I still adhere to the idea that if you need perfume, it means you need to shower more often! On a related thought, do you have trouble finding deodorants? The only one I've recently found that's unscented is by Arm & Hammer, but is that really unscented, or is it "masking scents" as you earlier described? Even for people who like perfume, who wants their deodorant/antiperspirant competing with perfume? To me, the purpose is to NOT stink, not to add odors to your body.

Actually, the only scent I've really liked lately is Ember's cat shampoo! :biggrin: That smells wonderful to me. (And don't make fun of me for bathing my cat...she's not very good at bathing herself at all, plus, when I take her to the farm for her shots, she comes home stinking like the farm, and if I take a shower when I get home from there, so does she!)
 

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