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Wearing Clothing in Exceptionally Hot Weather?

  1. Jul 12, 2007 #1

    Simfish

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    As we all know, core body temperature is around 98.6 degrees Farenheit. It is more comfortable for one to wear less clothing when the temperatures are in the 80s and 90s (since this allows core body heat to more easily disperse outside). But what if the temperatures are in the upper 90s and 100s? (wherein your body heat is not necessarily going to disperse outside?) Then will wearing clothing do no extra harm? (and possibly help - in that high temperatures usually also come with high levels of UV radiation)
     
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  3. Jul 12, 2007 #2
    I would say this is not the case, since your body is constantly generating more heat. If you place yourself inside somewhat insulating clothing and transfer heat from your body to this system, it will gradually get hotter and hotter. It would be better to not let this heat accumulate, so wear a tshirt. :tongue:
     
  4. Jul 12, 2007 #3

    Ivan Seeking

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    You also have to factor in sweat evaporation, humidity, air movement, and the clothing of choice, and I don't think there is any simple answer.

    There is definitely a point where clothing is a benefit. In the obvious limit, you want a fire suit if you plan to walk around a volcano or into a fire.

    A buddy once rode up to our place on a motorcycle; starting from S. California while following the I-5 north, which takes you right through the desert. It was well over 100 degrees when he got the wise idea to open up the bike [while in the middle of nowhere]. He said that at about 120 mph or so, the heat was suddenly overwhelming and he nearly passed out before he managed to slow down. In this situation he clearly would be better off with heavier clothing. He was wearing something like jeans, a T-shirt, and a helmet.
     
    Last edited: Jul 12, 2007
  5. Jul 13, 2007 #4

    wolram

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    My dad often relates the story of how a soldier would be open to court martial if he was caught not wearing a shirt in the desert, i forget the fine points but, it was thought that not wearing a shirt would cause heat stroke,
    and as there was a rule about self inflicted injury, so not wearing a shirt = self inflicted injury.
     
  6. Jul 13, 2007 #5
    I have some desert robes, from trips taken many years ago. Light weight cotton, and very comfortable. They allow air to flow, while shading your body from the sun.
     
  7. Jul 13, 2007 #6

    DaveC426913

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    Actually, this is the of the most widely misquoted values in human history.

    The seminal study that set the standard for body temperature was in Celsius, and it was 36.6C. But because of normal variation in body temp. it was typically rounded to 37C - which when converted to Fahrenheit is the expected 98.6F.

    The more accurate average body temp is 97.88F.

    Surprise!
     
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2007
  8. Jul 18, 2008 #7
    just drove past a farm on a hot day where
    all the strawberry pickers were totally covered,
    some in what seemed like thick sweatshirts.
    of course they have other concerns like
    mosquitos. but i think from their experience
    it seemed like wearing more clothes was not
    a negative thing
     
  9. Jul 18, 2008 #8

    BobG

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    I was always under the impression that a person shouldn't wear any clothes unless they're cooking bacon. I wear a fire suit when cooking bacon since you have hot grease spattering at a minimum and have a 60% chance of a grease fire.

    Usually I just have those pre-packaged sausages. Unfortunately, you can never find pre-packaged bacon.
     
  10. Jul 18, 2008 #9
    You shouldn't wear clothes in such hot weather.
     
  11. Jul 18, 2008 #10

    Moonbear

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    I agree. :biggrin: A big umbrella to protect you from UV is sufficient, or just stay indoors...I prefer standing in a cool shower if too hot. I haven't yet convinced the cat that taking off her fur coat and standing in the shower would help her, but she also hasn't convinced me that the blood loss she inflicts helps either.
     
  12. Jul 18, 2008 #11
    Sure you can Bob, several companies make pre-cooked pre- packaged bacon. Its paper thin, yet it does the trick.
     
  13. Jul 18, 2008 #12

    LowlyPion

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    [​IMG]
     
  14. Jul 18, 2008 #13

    BobG

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    :bugeye: I never knew! All I know of life comes from songs! I suppose the next thing you'll tell me is that there's no such thing as Dijon ketchup!
     
  15. Jul 18, 2008 #14
    Simfishy did use the word "around." So, being off by less than a degree, I'd say Simfishy should be excused for this crime.
     
  16. Jul 18, 2008 #15

    Evo

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    Then why is it that most people, when they have their temperature taken, it's 98.6F?
     
  17. Jul 18, 2008 #16

    LowlyPion

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  18. Jul 18, 2008 #17

    DaveC426913

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    How many have you personally checked?


    I would suggest that it is a self-perpetuating myth.
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2008
  19. Jul 18, 2008 #18

    Evo

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    From Dr visits and child care visits and from checking temperatures at home all of my life, my siblings and children. So I would say thousands of times. Anywhere you look, that is the norm, I'd say it's a pretty close range. You do know that women gauge when they are ovulating by this temperature, right? That's millions.

    How many people go to the doctor and have 98.6 when it's normal? I find that it is all of the time.

    I do tend to have drops in temperature when I am sick.
     
  20. Jul 18, 2008 #19

    LowlyPion

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    Some of it may well be. For instance glass thermometers get sealed and then the gradations stenciled on depending on the level that they are manufacturing it for. For marketing reasons their thermometers might be considered defective if they showed other than 98.6 for normal.

    And health care professionals will either tell you your temperature is normal or 98.6 because you might be concerned if they told you different and then they would need to explain away something that is not a problem to begin with. This may explain too why home electronic thermometers register differently from 98.6 when you have no fever.
     
  21. Jul 18, 2008 #20

    LowlyPion

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    Yes, but thermometers are able to resolve small differences and so long as the ovulation difference is resolvable, whether it's actually off 98.6 or not may not matter.
     
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