What are the properties of lithium gas?

  • #1
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Main Question or Discussion Point

I know this may be a dumb question but I don't know it. What I want to know is when lithium is heat and becomes a gas/vapor, does it still have the properties of lithium. Also I know that when water is changed between a liquid, gas, and solid, it always stays as H2O on the molecular level, can lithium or other material do the same?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Borek
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does it still have the properties of lithium.
Which properties? It is a gas now, so it doesn't have malleability, also its density and conductivity (and zillions other things) have changed.
 
  • #3
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Which properties? It is a gas now, so it doesn't have malleability, also its density and conductivity (and zillions other things) have changed.
Sorry my bad I keep forgetting to add all the important information. I was originally looking into how batteries work. I was doing some research on the anodes and cathodes and how they work. I found that lithium is a anode, then I had and ideas. Now since I don't fully understand how the anodes and cathodes move energy I don't know if this is possible. My idea was if you heated lithium to the point it becomes a vapor/gas and make it dense enough, will energy still be able to pass through it the same way it does it in a battery. So when I said property, I was trying to say can it still have energy move through it if it is dense enough.
 
  • #4
Borek
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I am afraid your post is riddled with misconceptions to the point where it is impossible to address.

Not even sure what you mean by "moving energy".

I feel like you may need a primer in physics and chemistry, otherwise you will be wasting time chasing some erroneous ideas.
 
  • #5
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I am afraid your post is riddled with misconceptions to the point where it is impossible to address.

Not even sure what you mean by "moving energy".

I feel like you may need a primer in physics and chemistry, otherwise you will be wasting time chasing some erroneous ideas.
Thanks for helping. The only reason I asked this on here was because I am not taking physics yet and I have questions that I want answered.
 
  • #6
Borek
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No problem - but if so I would suggest getting some basic physics and chemistry books and trying to learn from them, we will be happy to help. You need some basic understanding of the nature physical and chemical of things and some basic understanding of the language used to talk about them. Otherwise we will end frustrated on both sides - we, as we wouldn't be able to help, you, as you wouldn't be able to understand.
 

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