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What is pseudo-spin wave?

  1. Mar 29, 2005 #1
    Hi, I am not a physicist but a crystallographer. During I read a article I have found "Pseudo-spin wave", which I could not unterstand.
    What dose it mean exactly?
    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 29, 2005 #2

    ZapperZ

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    It would help if you make an EXACT citation to whatever it is you are reading. It gave the rest of us the ability to check the CONTEXT in which such terms are used. This is especially true in cases where the same terms are used to mean different things in different areas.

    This advice applies to everyone who wants to know what so-and-so means from something they read.

    Zz.
     
  4. Mar 30, 2005 #3
    I read an article about a phase transition. There are generally two types of phase transition. It is said that in order - disorder systems, like KDP (KH2PO4), the soft collective excitation are not phonos but rather unstable pseudo-spin waves. But I don't understand what it means.
     
  5. Mar 30, 2005 #4

    ZapperZ

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    And I responded:

    "It would help if you make an EXACT citation to whatever it is you are reading."

    If you believe that what you have just told me qualifies as an exact citation, then I am unable to help you.

    Zz.
     
  6. Mar 30, 2005 #5

    Gokul43201

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    oh1905, by exact citation, Zz means a reference to the article, including authors, journal, volume, page numbers and year.

    Secondly, do you know what a spin-wave is ? Look for Bloch's theory of spin waves in ferromagnets (other spin waves are similar).

    Next what you need is an understanding of pseudo-spin. As I'm not terribly familiar with this, I can't say much about it. The one context that I'm roughly aware of is in a 2-level system, you may choose to treat the system like a spin 1/2 system and define an operator that plays the role of Sz. This is your "pseudo-spin" operator and its evolution can give rise to pseudo-spin waves (I guess).
     
  7. Mar 30, 2005 #6

    ZapperZ

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    The problem in responding to something this vague is that I have no clue if a "pseudo-spin wave" is really just a bad terminology being used to refer to "magnons", or if it is really referring to a loosely-defined "spinons", similar to the system you mentioned. I've seen papers making references to "spin waves" to either of them.

    It is why I asked for an exact citation.

    Zz.
     
  8. Mar 30, 2005 #7

    Gokul43201

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    I suspect the OP misunderstood what was meant by a citation.
     
  9. Mar 31, 2005 #8
    For example, in the articles by Chen Jun et al 1988 J. Phys. C: Solid State Phys. 21 2255-2266 or T3 / 2 Contribution to the Specific Heat of Ferroelectrics at Low Temperatures by W. N. Lawless Phys. Rev. Lett. 36, 478–479 (1976), this terminology "pseudo-spin wave" is used. I guess, this terminology comes from spin-wave like the prefix "ferro" was borrowed form the field of ferromagnetism to take note of certain similarities of the properities of ferroelectrics and ferroelastics with those of ferromagnetics. But I could not find it in the books about solid state physics.
     
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