What is the Relationship Between Electron Energy and Acceleration Voltage?

In summary, the conversation is about solving a problem involving the relationship between current and charge. The solution involves using the elementary relation Q = it and dividing the average current by the number of pulses per second. The units of power are discussed in the later part of the conversation.
  • #1
Oshada
41
0

Homework Statement



ISdSt.jpg


Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution



I'm at a loss as to starting the problem. Any help is appreciated!
 
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  • #2
What is the relationship between current and charge?
 
  • #3
i = dQ/dt, but I can't figure out how to derive/integrate here :(
 
  • #4
Oshada said:
i = dQ/dt, but I can't figure out how to derive/integrate here :(

No integration is required. You're given the current (0.5 A) and the time that it flows for each pulse (0.10 μs). If 0.5 A flows for 0.10 μs, how much charge has moved?
 
  • #5
Thank you very much, I forgot the elementary relation Q = it. I got 3.1 * 10^11 electrons for a) which is the right answer :)

For part b), do we just divide average current per pulse by number of pulses per second?
 
  • #6
Oshada said:
For part b), do we just divide average current per pulse by number of pulses per second?

The average current will be given by the total charges moved in a second, divided by one second. You've found the charge q moved per pulse, and you know the number of pulses per second, so...
 
  • #7
Yup, got it. Part c) ?
 
  • #8
What are the units of power? What's the energy per charge? Per pulse?
 
  • #9
Again, I have forgotten that electrons having an energy of 50 MeV have been accelerated across 50 MV. Thanks!
 

1. What is a pulsing beam of electrons?

A pulsing beam of electrons is a stream of electrons that are emitted in a pulsing fashion, meaning they are released in short bursts rather than a continuous flow. This can be achieved through various methods such as modulating the power supply or using a pulsed laser to excite the electrons.

2. How is a pulsing beam of electrons used in scientific research?

A pulsing beam of electrons is commonly used in scientific research for imaging and analysis purposes. It can be used in techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron diffraction to study the structure and properties of materials at the nanoscale level.

3. What are the advantages of using a pulsing beam of electrons?

One of the main advantages of using a pulsing beam of electrons is the ability to control the intensity and duration of the beam, which allows for more precise and targeted analysis. Additionally, pulsing beams can reduce damage to the sample being studied, as the bursts of electrons are less likely to cause heat buildup compared to a continuous beam.

4. Are there any limitations to using a pulsing beam of electrons?

One limitation of using a pulsing beam of electrons is that it may not be suitable for studying materials that are sensitive to electron beams or have a short lifetime. In these cases, a continuous beam may be preferred. Additionally, pulsing beams may not provide as high of a resolution as continuous beams in certain imaging techniques.

5. How is the pulsing rate of a beam of electrons determined?

The pulsing rate, or frequency, of a beam of electrons is determined by the source of the electrons and the method used to modulate or pulse the beam. This can vary depending on the specific equipment and setup being used, but it is typically controlled by adjusting the power supply or using a pulsed laser.

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