When elctrons pass through a bulb it poduces heat and light why?

  • Thread starter khizman
  • Start date
  • #1
14
0

Main Question or Discussion Point

:confused: ??
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
ranger
Gold Member
1,676
1
This may help you.

http://science.howstuffworks.com/light-bulb2.htm

As the electrons zip along through the filament, they are constantly bumping into the atoms that make up the filament. The energy of each impact vibrates an atom -- in other words, the current heats the atoms up. A thinner conductor heats up more easily than a thicker conductor because it is more resistant to the movement of electrons.

Bound electrons in the vibrating atoms may be boosted temporarily to a higher energy level. When they fall back to their normal levels, the electrons release the extra energy in the form of photons. Metal atoms release mostly infrared light photons, which are invisible to the human eye. But if they are heated to a high enough level -- around 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit (2,200 degrees C) in the case of a light bulb -- they will emit a good deal of visible light.
Basically its energy being transformed.
 
Last edited:

Related Threads for: When elctrons pass through a bulb it poduces heat and light why?

Replies
4
Views
5K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
3K
Top