Why neutrino may have magnetic moment

In summary, the conversation discusses the possibility of neutrinos having a magnetic moment despite being electrically neutral and not composed of quarks like neutrons. The validity of this idea is uncertain and further discussion on the topic can be found on a forum thread provided.
  • #1
Neitrino
137
0
Why neutrino may have magnetic moment?
Even if it is massive... it is not composite and it is electrical neutral...
 
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  • #2
Hi there,

I find your question interesting. This far from my field of expertise so I can't really say anything about this. But I went to look on the web and found this presentation (for which I don't know the validity of it):

www.cap.bnl.gov/nufact03/WG2/10june/fleming.pdf

Cheers
 
  • #3
I'm not going to argue one way or the other because
I really don't know much about it but
the neutrino has to have spin doesn't it and
neutrons are neutral too yet they have magnetic moments.
 
  • #4
Hi there,

granpa said:
neutrons are neutral too yet they have magnetic moments.

but neutrons are not leptons. They are composed of different quarks that can have magnetic moments, even though the total electric charge sums to zero.

Cheers
 

Related to Why neutrino may have magnetic moment

1. Why do some scientists believe that neutrinos may have a magnetic moment?

Some scientists believe that neutrinos may have a magnetic moment because of the results of various experiments, including the observation of neutrino oscillations. These oscillations suggest that neutrinos have mass, which in turn implies that they may also have a magnetic moment.

2. What is a magnetic moment and how does it relate to neutrinos?

A magnetic moment is a measure of the strength and direction of a magnetic field produced by a particle. In the case of neutrinos, a magnetic moment would indicate that the particle has a magnetic field associated with it, which would give it the ability to interact with other charged particles.

3. What evidence supports the idea that neutrinos have a non-zero magnetic moment?

One of the main pieces of evidence supporting the idea that neutrinos have a non-zero magnetic moment is the observation of neutrino oscillations. This phenomenon can only be explained if neutrinos have mass, which in turn suggests the existence of a magnetic moment. Additionally, theoretical models and calculations also support the idea that neutrinos have a magnetic moment.

4. How can we detect the presence of a magnetic moment in neutrinos?

Detecting the presence of a magnetic moment in neutrinos is a challenging task, but there are several proposed methods. One approach is to study the interactions between neutrinos and other particles, such as electrons, in a magnetic field. Another method is to look for deviations in the expected behavior of neutrinos in different environments, such as in different types of matter or in different energy ranges.

5. What implications would the discovery of a magnetic moment in neutrinos have?

If a magnetic moment is discovered in neutrinos, it would have significant implications for our understanding of the universe. It would provide further evidence for the Standard Model of particle physics and could potentially shed light on the mysterious properties of neutrinos, such as their mass and their role in the formation of the universe. It could also have practical applications in fields such as astrophysics and particle physics research.

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