Are AP Physics B Exam Projectile Problems More Complex Than Honors Physics?

In summary, the conversation is about a student's concern about studying for the projectiles portion of the upcoming AP Physics B exam. They ask for help in finding practice problems and another classmate offers to create a complicated problem involving projectiles and momentum. The original student also requests a problem involving projectiles and momentum, as well as conservation of energy, and the classmate provides two different scenarios for them to practice with.
  • #1
fantolay
5
0
Hello guys.

I remember some basic projectiles problems from Honors Physics last year, but I have a feeling they don't involve some of the same complicated concepts of projectiles problems that appear on the AP exam.

This Friday my teacher is going to give the class a single question from I believe the AP Physics B exam, which will cover projectiles. The last part of the question will ask about forces.

Does anyone know of any places that have example problems from the AP exam, in particular example projectiles problems from the exam? I have a feeling that would be the best way for me to study this material.

I appreciate any help
 
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  • #2
Um... I don't really know where you could find some but If you like I can give you one that is really complicated and covers Projectiles, and Momentum or even I can put some Spring stuff in there or Conservation of Energy... I am kinda good at making problems so just let me know and ill think one up


FoxCommander
 
  • #3
FoxCommander, if you could create a problem that involves projectile motion and momentum, that would be fantastic! If it is really complicated making one then don't worry about it, but otherwise I would greatly appreciate it!

Thanks
 
  • #4
Ok here is one that isn't two complicated...

A bullet of mass 75 grams going at 200m/s hits a block and sticks to it, the block is at the edge of a cliff 45 meters high. The block and the bullet fly off and hit the ground 60 meters away. What is the mass of the Block?

Here is one that is even more complicated...

A block rests at the top of a cliff that is H meters high. A bullet is fired from ground level at a speed of 300 m/s and a mass of 65 grams at an angle theta such that the bullet hits the block horizontally. The block has a mass of 4kg. After the collision the block and the bullet fly off and hit the ground 15 meters from the base. Find the 'H' the height of the cliff and Theta, the angle the bullet was shot off with

I just made these up as i wrote them so let me know if something doesn't add up or if it is too complicated ha ha


FoxCommander
 

Related to Are AP Physics B Exam Projectile Problems More Complex Than Honors Physics?

1. What are projectiles in AP Physics?

Projectiles in AP Physics refer to objects that are launched into the air and move in a curved path due to the force of gravity. They follow the laws of motion and can be described using equations such as the projectile motion equations.

2. How are projectiles affected by air resistance?

Air resistance can affect projectiles by slowing down their horizontal velocity and altering their trajectory. This is because air resistance creates a force that acts in the opposite direction of the projectile's motion. The effect of air resistance is more significant for larger and slower-moving projectiles.

3. What is the difference between horizontal and vertical motion in projectiles?

Horizontal motion in projectiles refers to the motion of the object in the x-axis, while vertical motion refers to the motion in the y-axis. The horizontal motion is constant, while the vertical motion is affected by gravity. This causes the projectile to move in a curved path.

4. How do you calculate the maximum height and range of a projectile?

The maximum height of a projectile can be calculated using the formula h = (v0)2sin2(θ)/2g, where v0 is the initial velocity and θ is the angle of launch. The range of a projectile can be calculated using the formula R = (v0)2sin(2θ)/g.

5. How can you determine the velocity of a projectile at any given point?

The velocity of a projectile at any given point can be determined by using the equations of motion. The x-velocity is constant, while the y-velocity changes due to the force of gravity. The resultant velocity can be calculated using the Pythagorean theorem, where the resultant velocity is the hypotenuse of a right triangle formed by the x and y velocities.

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