Are degrees of freedom in a molecule affected by phase change?

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For a molecule of water, I understand that there are 6 degrees of freedom for each of the three atoms within it; 3 translational and 3 due to the potential energy of the bonds. Is this at all affected when the water goes from solid to liquid or gas?
 
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ZapperZ
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For a molecule of water, I understand that there are 6 degrees of freedom for each of the three atoms within it; 3 translational and 3 due to the potential energy of the bonds. Is this at all affected when the water goes from solid to liquid or gas?
Do you think that when something that can move freely in 3D is suddenly confined to a fixed location would have the same degree of freedom?

Zz.
 
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For a molecule of water, I understand that there are 6 degrees of freedom for each of the three atoms within it; 3 translational and 3 due to the potential energy of the bonds. Is this at all affected when the water goes from solid to liquid or gas?
Nope, the number of degrees of freedom is exactly identical. 3 (xyz) per atom, giving 9 per molecule. The other way of looking at it is 3 rot + 3 Trans +1 bend +2 stretch =9 degrees of freedom per molecule.

Even in bulk ice you get those modes.
 

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