Balanceing equations PLEASE HELP

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In summary, the conversation is about balancing equations and the last question is asking for the balanced chemical reaction for the rusting of iron. The correct balanced equation is 4Fe + 3O2 = 2Fe2O3.
  • #1
Balanceing equations PLEASE HELP!

I have most of the questions complete I just need help with the last one...

1. What was the initial temperature in the jar?
88 degrees F

2. What was the temperature after the reaction?
98 degrees F

3. What was the change in temperature?
10 degrees F

4. Based on information from Part I and from observations, was this reaction Exothermic or Endothermic?
Exothermic

5. Are chemical bonds forming or breaking?
Both one bond is brakeing to form another

6. In this experiment, the acidic vinegar dissolved a protective coating off the steel wool, allowing the oxidation of the steel to begin. This process is called rusting. In this reaction, iron(III) is combined with oxygen gas to form iron oxide.

Write the balanced chemical reaction for the rusting of iron

This is the one i need help with. I have no idea what I'm doing when it comes to balanceing equations I'm guessing..it would be something like 4Fe + 3O2 = 2Fe2O3 ?PLEASE SOMEONE TELL ME IF I"M RIGHT!
 
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  • #2
southerngirl5390 said:
reaction, iron(III) is combined with oxygen gas to form iron oxide.

Write the balanced chemical reaction for the rusting of iron

This is the one i need help with. I have no idea what I'm doing when it comes to balanceing equations I'm guessing..it would be something like 4Fe + 3O2 = 2Fe2O3 ?PLEASE SOMEONE TELL ME IF I"M RIGHT!

Yes it is correct.
 
  • #3
Thank you!
 

1. What is the purpose of balancing equations?

Balancing equations is essential in chemistry because it allows us to accurately represent the reactants and products involved in a chemical reaction. It ensures that the law of conservation of mass is followed, meaning that the total number of atoms of each element is the same on both sides of the equation.

2. How do you balance chemical equations?

To balance a chemical equation, you must adjust the coefficients (numbers in front of each compound or element) until the number of atoms of each element on both sides of the equation is equal. You can do this by using the principle of conservation of mass and following a systematic approach, such as the "hit and trial" method or the algebraic method.

3. What does it mean when an equation is balanced?

A balanced equation means that the number of atoms of each element is the same on both sides of the equation. This is achieved by adjusting the coefficients of the compounds or elements in the equation. A balanced equation also follows the law of conservation of mass, meaning that the total mass of the reactants is equal to the total mass of the products.

4. Can a chemical equation be balanced by changing the subscripts?

No, balancing equations requires adjusting the coefficients, not the subscripts. Changing the subscripts would result in a different chemical compound, thus altering the reaction and its products. The only exception is when balancing redox reactions, where changing the subscripts may be necessary to balance the number of oxygens.

5. Are there any tips or tricks for balancing equations?

Yes, there are a few tips and tricks that can make balancing equations easier. These include starting with the most complex compound or element, balancing polyatomic ions as a whole, and using fractions as coefficients if necessary. It is also helpful to double-check your work and make sure that the number of atoms of each element is equal on both sides of the equation.

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