Block sliding down a track

  • Thread starter toastie
  • Start date
  • #1
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Homework Statement


A block of mass m=1.3 kg slides down a frictionless track, as in the attachment diagram. The block is released at height h=4m. The radius of the curvature of the track at the bottom is R=1m. What is the force of the track on the block at A?

Untitled.jpg


Homework Equations


Fg+N=0


The Attempt at a Solution


I assumed that the track would be applying the normal force on the block, but the block does have some velocity and acceleration once it hits the bottom of the track, but I am not sure how to incorporate those.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Cyosis
Homework Helper
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Is the track a half pipe like track? Either way you have to take the centripetal force into account.
 
  • #3
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The track goes down and then stops at B.
 
  • #4
Cyosis
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That may be, but you're asking what happens in a point A, since I cannot see the picture I don't know exactly how the track looks like. It is doubtful that it matters though I will say it again, centripetal force!
 
  • #5
tiny-tim
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
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A block of mass m=1.3 kg slides down a frictionless track, as in the attachment diagram. The block is released at height h=4m. The radius of the curvature of the track at the bottom is R=1m. What is the force of the track on the block at A?

Hi toastie! :smile:

You need to use good ol' Newton's second law in the vertical direction … F = ma …

so what is the vertical acceleration (at point A)?

and how many forces are there at A? :wink:
 

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