Calcium Build Up and Corrosion

In summary, the presence of calcium build up on a metal surface may not have an immediate negative effect, but over time it can reduce heat transfer and increase local temperature, leading to accelerated corrosion. The severity of the corrosion will depend on factors such as temperature swings, other corrosive substances present, and the load bearing capacity of the metal. In aqeous environments, calcium deposits can also lead to reduced performance and potential damage to metal objects such as shower heads.
  • #1
VooDoo
59
0
Hey Guys,

Just curiosity, but if a metal surface has a build up of calcium does this mean there is a higher chance of corrosion occurring? Or can it accelerate corrosion? Or is the build up on the surface of metal generally harmless?
 
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  • #2
VooDoo said:
Hey Guys,

Just curiosity, but if a metal surface has a build up of calcium does this mean there is a higher chance of corrosion occurring? Or can it accelerate corrosion? Or is the build up on the surface of metal generally harmless?
Is this a heat transfer/heated surface?

Ca and Si (in aqueous systems) contribute to scale, and over time on a heated surface, they can reduce heat transfer coefficient and increase local temperature, which further drives corrosion.

Corrosion (conversion of metal to metal oxide) are driven by temperature and availability of oxygen at the metal/oxide interface.
 
  • #3
Thanks for the reply. The piece of metal has just been exposed to the outside environment and is not in a aqeuous environment.

So would it be correct to say that the build up of calcium has no major negative effect on the metal besides maybe effecting its visual apprearance?

Whereas a shower head which is in a aqeous environment can be effected by calcium deposits due to the increased chance of corrosion?
 
  • #4
outside environment and is not in a aqeuous environment.
So it's not in water, but outside, it is exposed to humidity, condensation, rain?

Well, depending on temperature swings and other corrosive species like Cl or NaCl, it could eventually shorten the service life, especially if it is load bearing.

Any scale may harbor moisture and other corrosive species, such as chlorides. Local deposits could lead to pitting and perhaps perforation of a metal sheet, depending on thickness.

Ca salt deposits or scale in a shower head usually degrades performance, and can clog the spray head, or cause leakage around bushings or moveable joints.
 

Related to Calcium Build Up and Corrosion

1. What causes calcium build up and corrosion?

Calcium build up and corrosion is caused by the presence of hard water, which contains high levels of dissolved minerals such as calcium and magnesium. When this water is exposed to metal surfaces, it can cause a chemical reaction that leads to the formation of calcium deposits and corrosion.

2. How does calcium build up and corrosion affect plumbing systems?

Calcium build up and corrosion can have a negative impact on plumbing systems. The calcium deposits can clog pipes and reduce water flow, while corrosion can weaken and damage pipes, leading to leaks and other plumbing issues. This can result in costly repairs and replacements.

3. Can calcium build up and corrosion be prevented?

Yes, calcium build up and corrosion can be prevented. One way to prevent it is by installing a water softener, which removes the minerals from hard water. Regular maintenance and cleaning of plumbing systems can also help prevent calcium build up and corrosion.

4. How can calcium build up and corrosion be treated?

If calcium build up and corrosion have already occurred, there are several treatment options available. Descaling agents can be used to dissolve and remove the calcium deposits, and rust inhibitors can be used to prevent further corrosion. In severe cases, pipes may need to be replaced.

5. Are there any health risks associated with calcium build up and corrosion?

While calcium build up and corrosion can damage plumbing systems, there are no known health risks associated with it. However, if the corrosion leads to leaks, it can potentially contaminate the water supply and pose a health risk. It is important to address the issue promptly to prevent any potential health hazards.

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