Calculating Charge on 10cm Diameter Sphere: 3700V

In summary, the question asks for the charge in μC on a conducting sphere with a diameter of 10 centimeters and a measured voltage of 3700 V. Using the equation V=kq/R, the charge is found to be 0.041 microcoloumbs. However, the correct answer may have been missed due to not accounting for the radius in the calculations.
  • #1
FuzzyDunlop
7
0

Homework Statement


the question is A conducting sphere has a diameter of 10 centimeters. If you measure its voltage to be 3700 V, what is the charge in μC you have put on the sphere?


Homework Equations



V=3700, D=0.1 m, V=kq/R

The Attempt at a Solution



3700= (8.987 * 10^9 * q)/.1

q=.041 microcoloumbs.

but it says I am wrong?? am i making a mistake someplace?
 
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  • #2
What's the radius?
 
  • #3
LowlyPion said:
What's the radius?

oh my god I am stupid. thanks
 
  • #4
FuzzyDunlop said:
oh my god I am stupid. thanks

Careless ... maybe, but I suspect you will get over that.

Stupid? Not likely. You were smart enough to ask here.
 

Related to Calculating Charge on 10cm Diameter Sphere: 3700V

What is the formula for calculating charge on a 10cm diameter sphere?

The formula for calculating charge on a sphere is q = 4πε0r2V, where q is the charge, ε0 is the permittivity of free space, r is the radius of the sphere, and V is the voltage.

What is the value of ε0 in the calculation?

The value of ε0 is a constant equal to 8.85 x 10-12 C2/N∙m2. It represents the ability of a vacuum to hold an electric field.

How do I convert 3700V to the correct unit for the calculation?

In the formula, V represents voltage in units of volts. So, you do not need to convert 3700V to a different unit for the calculation.

What is the unit of measurement for the result of the calculation?

The unit of measurement for the result of the calculation is coulombs (C), which is the unit for electric charge.

Can this formula be used for spheres of different sizes or only for a 10cm diameter sphere?

This formula can be used for spheres of any size. You just need to substitute the appropriate value for the radius (r) in the formula.

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