Calculating the integrated Beta dose in dense materials (radiolysis)

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Summary
I need to calculate the Beta dose deposited in plastic. Source is Co-60 or Cs-137. The question is relevant for radiolysis/degradation of plastic materials in a repository.
I have plastic which contains large amounts of Co-60 and Cs-137. I have already calculated the integrated (50k years) deposited dose from the gamma radiation using Monte-Carlo methods (SCALE).

I am now interested in the contribution to deposited dose from the Beta emissions.
-I am assuming that all Beta is stopped in the plastic itself.
-For Co-60, the average Beta energy is about E=0,31*(1/3) Mev.
-The conversion factor from MeV to Joules is C=1.6e-13 J/MeV.

Would the instant contribution to deposited dose in Gy (J/kg) per second from Co-60 Beta be:
E*C*I/m,

where I is the intensity in Bq and m is the mass?

Side note: Bremsstrahlung photons will also contribute to dose, but I have a feeling that this contribution is minor.


Best regards,

Peter, Phd
 
Last edited:

Astronuc

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One would calculate the energy emitted from the 60Co and 137Cs. In one's problem, one wishes to calculate the dose in the plastic, so one must determine the mass of the radionuclides and then multiply by the ratio of mass of radionuclide(s) to the mass of the plastic.
 

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