Cart down a ramp, acceleration of 0.6m/s^2

In summary, the conversation discusses the calculation of acceleration when a cart is rolled down a ramp with a tickertape. The expected acceleration of 9.8m/s^2 was not obtained and instead, values like 0.6m/s^2 were calculated. This discrepancy can be explained by the slope of the ramp, as acceleration is dependent on it and not just gravity. This is because the cart is not in free-fall, but rather rolling or sliding down an inclined plane, affected by factors such as friction.
  • #1
jnimagine
178
0
We rolled down a cart down a ramp with a tickertape. When the average velocities were calulated and they were used to calculate acceleration. But we got acceleration of like 0.6, 0.2m/s^2 etc... shouldn't it be 9.8m/s^2..?! When i graphed the average velocity and the line of best fit was drawn and the slope calculated i got 6.5m/s^2. Why did i get an acceleration of such numbers like 0.6?? What are some explanations to account for this acceleration?
 
Last edited:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
jnimagine said:
We rolled down a cart down a ramp with a tickertape. When the average velocities were calulated and they were used to calculate acceleration. But we got acceleration of like 0.6, 0.2m/s^2 etc... shouldn't it be 9.8m/s^2..?! When i graphed the average velocity and the line of best fit was drawn and the slope calculated i got 6.5m/s^2. Why did i get an acceleration of such numbers like 0.6?? What are some explanations to account for this acceleration?
In which direction does the cart's weight act?
 
  • #3
Hootenanny said:
In which direction does the cart's weight act?

um.. the cart's weight acts down??
 
  • #4
jnimagine said:
um.. the cart's weight acts down??
Down the ramp or directly down towards the centre of the earth?
 
  • #5
Hootenanny said:
Down the ramp or directly down towards the centre of the earth?

down toward the earth... so there are two directions involved in this motion??
so 9.8m/s^2 is the acceleration down towards the earth... then what would be 0.6m/s^2??
 
  • #6
cart down a ramp accelerates at 0.6m/s^2?? not 9.8m/s^2?

We rolled down a cart down a ramp with a tickertape. When the average velocities were calulated and they were used to calculate acceleration. But we got acceleration of like 0.6, 0.2m/s^2 etc... shouldn't it be 9.8m/s^2..?! When i graphed the average velocity and the line of best fit was drawn and the slope calculated i got 6.5m/s^2. Why did i get an acceleration of such numbers like 0.6?? What are some explanations to account for this acceleration?
 
  • #7
The acceleration depends on the slope of the ramp. 9.8 m/s^2 would only be expected if the ramp were vertical--the cart was in free fall. :wink:
 
  • #8
This is easy enough to calculate by finding the component of the gravitational force that is applied along the slope of the ramp. It's simple trigonometry.
 
  • #9
Doc Al said:
The acceleration depends on the slope of the ramp. 9.8 m/s^2 would only be expected if the ramp were vertical--the cart was in free fall. :wink:

then what is 0.6m/s^2?
 
  • #10
jnimagine said:
then what is 0.6m/s^2?
Re-read Doc Al's post.
 
  • #11
Acceleration is equal to gravity only if the object is in free-fall. If the object is rolling or sliding down an inclined plane, the acceleration is dependent on friction and the angle of the incline. Remember that acceleration down an inclined plane is independent of the mass. Hope this helps!
 

Related to Cart down a ramp, acceleration of 0.6m/s^2

1. What is the acceleration of the cart down a ramp?

The acceleration of the cart down a ramp is 0.6 meters per second squared (m/s^2). This means that the cart's velocity increases by 0.6 m/s every second it travels down the ramp.

2. How is the acceleration of the cart down a ramp calculated?

The acceleration of the cart down a ramp can be calculated using the formula a = (vf - vi) / t, where a is acceleration, vf is final velocity, vi is initial velocity, and t is time. In this case, the final velocity would be the speed of the cart at the bottom of the ramp, the initial velocity would be the speed of the cart at the top of the ramp, and the time would be the duration of the cart's journey down the ramp.

3. What factors affect the acceleration of the cart down a ramp?

The acceleration of the cart down a ramp is affected by several factors, including the angle and length of the ramp, the mass of the cart, and the force acting on the cart (such as gravity or friction).

4. Can the acceleration of the cart down a ramp be negative?

Yes, the acceleration of the cart down a ramp can be negative if the cart is moving in the opposite direction of the ramp's slope. This is known as deceleration or negative acceleration.

5. How does the acceleration of the cart down a ramp relate to Newton's second law of motion?

Newton's second law of motion states that the acceleration of an object is directly proportional to the net force acting on it and inversely proportional to its mass. In the case of a cart down a ramp, the net force acting on the cart is its weight, and the mass of the cart remains constant. Therefore, the acceleration of the cart is directly proportional to its weight and can be calculated using the formula a = F/m.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
18
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
10
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
2
Replies
38
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
8
Views
855
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
2
Replies
56
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
32
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
2
Views
4K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
2K
Back
Top