Charge and Electric Field Intensity

In summary, the greater electric field intensity of the sphere compared to the thin rod with the same charge can be explained by the curvature of their surfaces. Conductors at electrostatic equilibrium have stronger electric fields where the surface is most curved. This is because the repulsive force of the charges is no longer parallel to the surface on a curved surface. Other variables that may influence electric field intensity include force, work, and distance.
  • #1
Soaring Crane
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If there are two bodies, such as a sphere and a thin rod (each with exactly the same charge), why does the sphere have a greater electric field intensity? Are there any other variables that influence the electric field intensity if the charge is not an ultimate dependent factor?

If the charges are the same, would the intensity difference have anything to do with the force, work, or distance involved?
 
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  • #2
Soaring Crane said:
If there are two bodies, such as a sphere and a thin rod (each with exactly the same charge), why does the sphere have a greater electric field intensity? Are there any other variables that influence the electric field intensity if the charge is not an ultimate dependent factor?

If the charges are the same, would the intensity difference have anything to do with the force, work, or distance involved?

Well the answer to your question has to do with the surface. Particularly the curvature of the surface. Conductors at electrostatic equilibrium have stronger electric field where the surface is most curved.

Consider a flat surface, there are n charges (electrons). Being that they have a negative charge, they will repel each other. The repulsive force is directly parallel to the surface.

Now if we have n charges along a curved surface, the repulsive force is no longer parallel to the surface, but at an angle.

Do you get the idea what's happening here?
 
  • #3
Yes, I think I have a clearer idea now.
 

Related to Charge and Electric Field Intensity

1. What is charge and how is it measured?

Charge is a fundamental property of matter that determines how it interacts with electric and magnetic fields. It is measured in units of coulombs (C) and can be either positive or negative. The magnitude of charge is determined by the number of excess or deficient electrons in an object.

2. How does the presence of charge create an electric field?

When an object has a net charge, it creates an electric field in the space around it. The strength of this field is directly proportional to the magnitude of the charge and inversely proportional to the distance from the charge. The direction of the electric field is determined by the sign of the charge, with positive charges creating outward-pointing fields and negative charges creating inward-pointing fields.

3. What is the difference between electric field intensity and electric potential?

Electric field intensity, also known as electric field strength, is a measure of the strength of the electric field at a particular point. It is defined as the force per unit charge that a test charge would experience if placed in the field. On the other hand, electric potential is a measure of the electric potential energy per unit charge at a given point. It is related to the electric field by the equation E = -∇V, where E is the electric field and V is the electric potential.

4. How does the presence of charge affect the motion of charged particles?

Charged particles, such as electrons or protons, will experience a force when placed in an electric field. The direction of this force is determined by the charge of the particle and the direction of the electric field. If the particle is free to move, it will accelerate in the direction of the force. The magnitude of the acceleration can be calculated using Newton's second law, F = ma, where F is the force and m is the mass of the particle.

5. How do you calculate the electric field intensity at a given point?

The electric field intensity at a given point can be calculated using the equation E = kq/r^2, where E is the electric field intensity, k is the Coulomb's constant (9x10^9 Nm^2/C^2), q is the magnitude of the charge, and r is the distance from the charge to the point of interest. This equation is valid for a point charge, but for more complex charge distributions, the electric field can be calculated by summing the contributions from each individual charge using vector addition.

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