Classical Music

Math Is Hard

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I envy you, Adam. Australian storms must be magnificent. California storms are weak and puny. Maybe our actor/muscle-man governor will PUMP THEM UP!! ha ha

Chopin is nice for rainy days, too.

oh, yeah, Zoobie - I forgot about the 9th symphony, Ode to Jellyfish.
 
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Ode to Jellyfish is funky.

Also Winter allegro from Vivaldi.
 
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Adam said:
Ode to Jellyfish is funky.
Ode an die Jellyfische

von Friedrich Jellyfischer

Jellyfishy! Jellyfishy!
Daughter of the briney deep.
Here we flounder,
Drunk and stupid,
Much like cattle,
or like sheep.

Then your magic
Binds together
What old customs
Parted wide.

All mankind
Is reunited
When upon
The waves you ride!
 
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I don't to listen to music anymore, but when I did, I was almost exclusively a classical music fan. Almost anything by Bach, Vivaldi, Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms and Mahler will satisfy. Don't restrict yourself to symphonies, though. Trios, quartets, sonatas, concertos, etc should be the targets of your exploration. And that's another thing: explore. Read a few books about classical music. Learn about the different styles. Then try out 20th century music. Or medieval music. Or renaissance music. There's a lot to learn and enjoy.
 

chroot

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I just got introduced to Berlioz' Symphonie Fantastique by a friend, and I think it's definitely a new favorite.

- Warren
 

honestrosewater

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I would suggest buying a lot of cheap crap ;) Er, I mean, there are plenty of "greatest/favorites" collections, and big boxed sets that, though sometimes lacking in other areas, contain a great variety of music and artists. This is the best way to discover what *you* like, and it will help you appreciate the different performances, when you seek them out.

I would also warn against being unduly influenced by other's opinions- Chopin doesn't seem to make the cut around here- but he is one of my favorites. And I don't really enjoy Mozart- sometimes I find him downright annoying. Whatever floats your boat.

You may also want to watch the two Fantasia movies- they can get you to think about the music in different ways. And there are several movies about certain performers or featuring classical music (ex. Immortal Beloved, Red Violin). And watch live performances- PBS features them regularly- another person's passion or care can be inspiring.
Happy listening
Rachel
P.S. "Chopin: Nocturnes" performed by Ivan Moravec is one of my favorite CDs - you can find it on Amazon :)
 

Njorl

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honestrosewater said:
I would suggest buying a lot of cheap crap ;) Er, I mean, there are plenty of "greatest/favorites" collections, and big boxed sets that, though sometimes lacking in other areas, contain a great variety of music and artists. This is the best way to discover what *you* like, and it will help you appreciate the different performances, when you seek them out.
Absolutely. This is how I found what I liked and what I didn't. I had nearly forgotten.

So, what orchestras do people like?

I like Philadelphia's under Ormandy. I here they were better under Stokowski, but the recording tech was not as good. I also was suprised at how good the Cleveland orchestra was under Szell. I had never heard of them when I bought my first CD. I must say, I've always been disappointed by Bernstein's orchestra, maybe I had expectations set too high. You have to be careful with "London" orchestras. There are about 30 of them, and I know I can't keep them straight.

Njorl
 

Njorl

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zoobyshoe said:
I'm partial to P.D.Q. Bach's "Unbegun Symphony", as well. Consists of a third and fourth movement.
How about a game of "OPERA WHIZ!", or deuling divas!
:biggrin:

Njorl
 

Chi Meson

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IMO:
Classical music is at its best with J.S. Bach.
J.S. Bach is at his best at the piano (Klavier).
No one ever played bach on the piano better than Glen Gould.

You will not be disappointed by getting "The Goldberg Variations" as performed by Mr. Gould. He recorded it twice, 1955 and 1981. A real snob will insist the first recording was more masterful, although I am fond of the latter. I understand it has recently been remastered so that Mr. Gould's annoying habit to "sing along" has been removed.

Also you could try "The Well-tempered Klavier, Book1"

Fun fact:
Remember in "the Silence of the Lambs," the scen where Hannibal is in the cage in the big room, listening to classical music (right before he takes a bite out of the policeman's face)? Hannibal is listening to the 1955 recording of the "Aria" from Goldberg Variations.
 
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Math Is Hard said:
Zooby!! How could you not mention Rachmaninoff! He is our fellow April fool!
He has an amazing piece, I believe it is called Adagio. We played a bit of it in concert band before.
 
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Chi Meson said:
IMO:
Classical music is at its best with J.S. Bach.
Most people who appreciate and understand serious music would agree with this. He is more often ranked as the greatest composer who ever lived than any other composer.
However, huge amounts of Bach's music are not accessible to people who are switching over from a previous orientation in pop music. I think the Romantic composers are the best ones by which to make the transition.
J.S. Bach is at his best at the piano (Klavier).
Yes, provided you mention that he never actually wrote anything for the piano. It wasn't invented till he was an old man. He got to play one once and pronounced it seemed to have possibilities. The pieces by Bach that are commonly played on the piano nowadays were written for the harpsichord and clavichord. "Klavier" technically refers to any keyboard instrument, and technically includes the pipe organ, but a separation between the music he wrote for the "klavier" and the pipe organ is generally maintained. There is the issue of the pedal part, among other things.
No one ever played bach on the piano better than Glen Gould.
It might be better to say no one ever played Bach more brilliantly. He was a dazzling pianist. Critics and listeners alike sometimes took exception to some of his stranger interpretations.
You will not be disappointed by getting "The Goldberg Variations" as performed by Mr. Gould. He recorded it twice, 1955 and 1981. A real snob will insist the first recording was more masterful, although I am fond of the latter. I understand it has recently been remastered so that Mr. Gould's annoying habit to "sing along" has been removed.
I also like the second recording alot. The main trouble with it is that he was competing against no one but himself, and he had already blown everyone away with the first recording which was unbelievable. The 1955 Goldberg recording made Glen Gould, and it also made the Goldbergs what they are today. Before Glen Gould the Goldbergs were a part of harpsichord literature, and hence, relatively obscure. People certainly didn't play them as much as the Well Tempered Claver. Glen Gould made them part of piano literature.

I have exactly 20 different recordings of the Goldbergs. My favorite, after Glen Gould's, is by Charles Rosen. He takes all the repeats, in addition to giving an excellent performance, and I enjoy hearing them with the repeats.

I wouldn't reccomend them to anyone just starting out listening to serious music, though. They're too subtle. (Then there is that one slow, long, bleak, endless variation that brings everything to a halt for a while with it's cold, anxiety filled, winter.) I was quite bored with them the first time I heard them. Now, as you can probably tell, they are my favorite Bach. Maybe some other people will look into them on our reccomendation, but I wouldn't suggest them to Dooga.
Also you could try "The Well-tempered Klavier, Book1"
Overall, I actually like Book II better.
 
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What age did you guys all start to enjoy Classical Music? I'm curious. ;) An amazing turnout for the thread. I've got many songs to download yet. :)

So far my favorites are Mozart's Requiem and Beethoven's Symphony #6-5th Movement Allegreto. The name is long enough heh. But it could be the wrong name since downloading is weird that way.

Also, I have very low music knowledge. I get basic themes and messages from it. Like the Requiem delivers a powerful mood and such. I'm just wondering if there are other messages in the songs. Does each note symbolize a feeling for different composers or something. Are there any sites on this if that's the case?
 
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Math Is Hard

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My mother played classical music for me when I was in the womb. I guess that's why I have always loved it. Also I started playing piano when I was very young, so a lot of my appreciation of classical comes from pieces I learned to play. I would never have cared much for Bach if I hadn't actually worked through some of the inventios. The technical difficulty of the pieces made them exciting.
Do you play any instruments, Dooga?
 

Robert Zaleski

Peer Gynt-Suite 1, Op 46 and Suite 2, Op 55 by Edvard Grieg
 
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Dooga Blackrazor said:
What age did you guys all start to enjoy Classical Music? I'm curious.
I was about 14 before I got into it.
Beethoven's Symphony #6-5th Movement Allegreto. The name is long enough heh. But it could be the wrong name since downloading is weird that way.
No, you got it right. Strange, though. You picked the 5th movement of one of the only symphonies by anyone that has more than 4 movements. 4 movements is pretty standard for symphonys.
I'm just wondering if there are other messages in the songs. Does each note symbolize a feeling for different composers or something. Are there any sites on this if that's the case?
In serious music everything isn't called a "song". Everything is called a "piece", short for "piece of music." This is because that term covers everything, whereas "song" really only applies to individual pieces where there is singing. The Mozart requiem, for instance, wouldn't becalled a "song" because it is more than just one isolated piece of singing. Shubert and Brahms wrote alot of just plain songs. All the songs they wrote are still refered to as "pieces".

No, each note by itself has no meaning. It is only when they are put together in relation to other notes when you start to get signifigance.
 
Brahms, Mendelsohn, Wagner
 
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Mendelsohn? Are you joking? He's a freakin hack. :P
 
Math Is Hard said:
My mother played classical music for me when I was in the womb. I guess that's why I have always loved it. Also I started playing piano when I was very young, so a lot of my appreciation of classical comes from pieces I learned to play. I would never have cared much for Bach if I hadn't actually worked through some of the inventios. The technical difficulty of the pieces made them exciting.
Do you play any instruments, Dooga?
No instruments here. I might take up the piano someday. I found it was fairly easy to get the hang of when I played it in music class. I never bothered to take music this year or in the next two years. Unless your going into a musical career I feel it's more beneficial to take other subjects such as Physics. It just doesn't fit into my schedule. Perhaps if I need a hobby sometime I can look into it.
 
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Dooga Blackrazor said:
Unless your going into a musical career I feel it's more beneficial to take other subjects such as Physics. It just doesn't fit into my schedule. Perhaps if I need a hobby sometime I can look into it.
There is a whole physics to sound production in music that creates a great overlap between the two. I have lately been following this train of understanding, myself. Trying to grasp how musical instuments produce sound leads further and further into physics. Our own PF Administrator, Chroot, is a guitarist, and also quite adept at the physics of sound. The two disciplines support each other quite nicely.
 
I like Mendelsohn's Violin Concerto (I also like Tschaikovsky and Brahm's).
 

Chi Meson

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zoobyshoe said:
I have exactly 20 different recordings of the Goldbergs. My favorite, after Glen Gould's, is by Charles Rosen. He takes all the repeats, in addition to giving an excellent performance, and I enjoy hearing them with the repeats.

I wouldn't reccomend them to anyone just starting out listening to serious music, though. They're too subtle. (Then there is that one slow, long, bleak, endless variation that brings everything to a halt for a while with it's cold, anxiety filled, winter.) I was quite bored with them the first time I heard them. Now, as you can probably tell, they are my favorite Bach. Maybe some other people will look into them on our reccomendation, but I wouldn't suggest them to Dooga.
I agree with your asessment of the "middle" part of Goldberg; I often hit the skip button if I'm feeling impatient. But I think that anyone can be quickly pulled in by the Aria and the first 10 variations. The segue from Aria to variation 1 is without a doubt one of my favorite moments in Classical music.
 

Chi Meson

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Dooga Blackrazor said:
What age did you guys all start to enjoy Classical Music? I'm curious. ;) An amazing turnout for the thread. I've got many songs to download yet. :)
...
Also, I have very low music knowledge. I get basic themes and messages from it. Like the Requiem delivers a powerful mood and such. I'm just wondering if there are other messages in the songs. Does each note symbolize a feeling for different composers or something. Are there any sites on this if that's the case?
I started classical piano training at the age of FIVE. Stopped abruptly at high school and went straight to punk rock (imagine the shocked parents). I have now grown tolerant of all forms of music (except for "big hair" bands of the 80s, but they have all gone away now, and are but like a faint memory of a bad toothache).


Oh, and never let anyone tell you what mood you have to feel when listening to music. That's how you tell if it works for you.

THere are some "rules" to follow while listening (break 'em as you wish, of course): you never-ever "get it" on the first listen. IF you do, then you really didn't, or else the music is too simple. So give each piece three full-attention sittings. IF you listen to a sonata or concerto or symphony, listen to all the parts ("movements") in their proper order. Don't force your friends to "come in here and listen to this, it's amazing!" It never works.
 
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Chrono said:
I don't know about the rest of y'all but...I say it's time to start downloading.
what is this 'downloading' you speak of? ... :wink: :rofl:
 
I can play Beethoven's "Fur Elise" on my mandolin. :smile:
 
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Njorl

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How do you reach the keys while sitting on your mandolin?
 

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