Direction of field intensity .?

In summary, the question is asking for the direction of the electric field vector at point x on the 200Volt equipotential line.
  • #1
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Direction of field intensity...?

Problem:
"The vector that best describes the direction of the electric field intensity at point x on the 200Volt equipotential line is"?... ...(five multiple choice options)

There is a diagram of decreasing/increasing equipotentail lines with a point "x" on one which from four vectors are going, two parallel to the line and two perpendicular.

I know the answer they want, so I think I know what they mean( what direction is the electric field vector in).
My question is with the wording, "direction of the electric field intensity".
Does this even make any sense?
From what I understand "electric field intensity" is the magnitude of the electric field at that point. So it is just a scaler and does not have a direction...
Or am I missing/misunderstanding something?
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  • #2
The term "electric field intensity" does not make sense in this context. The vector that best describes the direction of the electric field at point x is the one that you need to select from the multiple choice options.
 
  • #3
I would like to clarify the terminology used in this problem. The electric field intensity at a point is a vector quantity, meaning it has both magnitude and direction. It is different from the electric field, which is a scalar quantity representing the strength of the electric field at a point.

In this context, the direction of the electric field intensity refers to the direction in which the electric field is pointing at point x on the 200Volt equipotential line. This can be represented by a vector pointing in the same direction as the electric field.

To determine the direction of the electric field intensity, we can use the concept of equipotential lines. These lines are perpendicular to the direction of the electric field, and the electric field intensity is always perpendicular to the equipotential lines. Therefore, the direction of the electric field intensity at point x on the 200Volt equipotential line would be perpendicular to the equipotential line at that point.

In terms of the multiple choice options provided, the correct answer would be the two vectors perpendicular to the equipotential line, as these represent the direction of the electric field intensity. I hope this clarifies any confusion regarding the terminology used in this problem.
 

1. What is the direction of field intensity?

The direction of field intensity is the direction in which a force would act on a positive test charge if it were placed in the field. It is typically represented by arrows pointing away from positive charges and towards negative charges.

2. How is the direction of field intensity determined?

The direction of field intensity is determined by the electric field lines, which are imaginary lines that represent the direction and strength of the electric field. These lines point in the direction of the field intensity at each point in space.

3. Can the direction of field intensity change?

Yes, the direction of field intensity can change depending on the location and orientation of the charges creating the field. It can also change if the strength of the field changes.

4. How does the direction of field intensity affect charged particles?

Charged particles will experience a force in the direction of the field intensity if they are placed in an electric field. The magnitude and direction of this force depends on the charge and the strength of the field.

5. Is the direction of field intensity the same as the direction of electric current?

No, the direction of field intensity and electric current are not necessarily the same. The direction of electric current is the direction in which positive charges flow, while the direction of field intensity is the direction in which a positive test charge would experience a force. In some cases, these directions may be the same, but not always.

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