Distance Travelled by Doubled Mass Block with Unchanged V0

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In summary, the question asks about the distance a block will slide after the pushing force is removed, given its initial velocity and mass. The equation F=ma can be used to solve the problem, with F representing the force, m representing the mass, and a representing the acceleration. With the given information, two equations can be set up to solve for the distance.
  • #1
zellster87
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Homework Statement


A block pushed along the floor with velocity V0 slides a distance D after the pushing force is removed.

If the mass of the block is doubled but its initial velocity is not changed, what distance does the block slide before stopping? Express your answer in terms of D.


Homework Equations


F = ma


The Attempt at a Solution



My only problem with this question, is that I simply don't know how to relate force, velocity and distance into an equation. I've tried rearranging Newtons, but I can seem to get the right ratio. Thanks for you time.
 
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  • #2
Here's my take- when you stop pushing the block it will SLOW DOWN (this is acceleration, just negative).

F=ma

So what are you constants 1?

What is your variable?

what level are you at? is friction involved in the problem, or did you type the whole thing?
 
  • #3
There is no friction invloved. What i typed, is exactly, and everything the problems gives. Their not looking for a numerical answer. Something like 0.5d or 0.25d or something.
 
  • #4
ok, so assume F stays the same you can set up 2 equations- what would they look like ?
 

Related to Distance Travelled by Doubled Mass Block with Unchanged V0

What is the formula for calculating distance travelled by a doubled mass block with unchanged initial velocity?

The formula for calculating distance travelled by a doubled mass block with unchanged initial velocity is d = 0.5 * m * v0^2, where d is the distance travelled, m is the mass of the block, and v0 is the initial velocity.

How does doubling the mass affect the distance travelled by a block with unchanged initial velocity?

Doubling the mass of a block while keeping the initial velocity unchanged will result in the block travelling four times the distance. This is because the mass is directly proportional to the distance travelled in the formula d = 0.5 * m * v0^2.

What is the relationship between mass and distance travelled in this scenario?

In this scenario, the relationship between mass and distance travelled is direct proportionality. This means that as the mass of the block increases, the distance travelled also increases, and vice versa.

How does initial velocity affect the distance travelled by a doubled mass block with unchanged initial velocity?

The initial velocity has a direct impact on the distance travelled by a doubled mass block. A higher initial velocity will result in the block travelling a greater distance, while a lower initial velocity will result in a shorter distance travelled.

Can we use this formula for calculating distance travelled by other objects?

Yes, this formula can be used to calculate the distance travelled by any object as long as the mass and initial velocity are known. However, it is important to note that this formula is specifically for a doubled mass block with an unchanged initial velocity. Other objects may require different formulas for calculating distance travelled.

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