Do the reviewers of PhD applications look at social media profiles?

In summary, social media can have an impact on job prospects these days. It could make someone reject you, depending on what is out there. It is a good idea to clean up your social media profiles now so that you do not have to worry about it.
  • #1
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It affects job prospects these days
I would have though though it'd have a much less impact on phd prospects?

Can it make someone reject you?

thanks
 
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  • #2
Depends what is out there. A picture of you drinking beer with friends, probably not. A picture of you beheading an infidel that received worldwide press, probably. In between will be in between.
 
  • #3
Vanadium 50 said:
Depends what is out there. A picture of you drinking beer with friends, probably not. A picture of you beheading an infidel that received worldwide press, probably. In between will be in between.

and in terms of how often these things are checked, I'd guess mostly they aren't since supervisors are so busy?
 
  • #4
Hard to tell.
 
  • #5
It could. I recommend that you set your personal profiles to private and create a separate academic/professional profile (like with linkedin)- keep those contacts totally separate. Anything you write can come back to haunt you and can been seen as a reflection of your organization. Clean it up now so that you don't have to worry about it! I would be real surprised if board members did not check social media profiles.
 
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  • #6
Fervent Freyja said:
It could. I recommend that you set your personal profiles to private and create a separate academic/professional profile (like with linkedin)- keep those contacts totally separate. Anything you write can come back to haunt you and can been seen as a reflection of your organization. Clean it up now so that you don't have to worry about it! I would be real surprised if board members did not check social media profiles.

are they more likely to check before shortlisting? or after an interview?
i had been shortlisted, attended an interview, waiting to hear back, it has registered with me now that it could influence, post interview...
 
  • #7
I don't know. But just in case, go ahead and do a quick clean up! What do you have on there so bad, if you don't mind my asking?
 
  • #8
Fervent Freyja said:
I don't know. But just in case, go ahead and do a quick clean up! What do you have on there so bad, if you don't mind my asking?

no that's fine, erm personal arguements, about being walked over by a sibling, feeling suicidal as a result of it, including swearing, not the best..
 
  • #9
That will depend on the people looking at your application. I don't think someone made a scientific study at which step (if at all) they are more likely to look for social media profiles.
 
  • #10
Fervent Freyja said:
It could. I recommend that you set your personal profiles to private and create a separate academic/professional profile (like with linkedin)- keep those contacts totally separate. Anything you write can come back to haunt you and can been seen as a reflection of your organization. Clean it up now so that you don't have to worry about it! I would be real surprised if board members did not check social media profiles.

by board members are you referring to supervisors or?
 
  • #11
Yes, I can relate to having a sibling that is very annoying. I think you will be okay, none of that is really bad enough to cause them to reject you.

Have you tried cutting yourself off from social media? I did it and feel much better. It was hard at first, but found I could spend that time on more productive things. I think that you should distance yourself from anyone that can lead you to feeling that bad about your life. Nobody should have to deal with people so toxic in their lives, sibling or not. :frown:
 
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  • #12
Fervent Freyja said:
Yes, I can relate to having a sibling that is very annoying. I think you will be okay, none of that is really bad enough to cause them to reject you.

Have you tried cutting yourself off from social media? I did it and feel much better. It was hard at first, but found I could spend that time on more productive things. I think that you should distance yourself from anyone that can lead you to feeling that bad about your life. Nobody should have to deal with people so toxic in their lives, sibling or not. :frown:

thank you for your kind advice, I've thought it's probably a good idea and tried but failed, in fairness I probably haven't tried harder.
 
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  • #13
Usually a committee?
 

1. Do PhD application reviewers actually look at applicants' social media profiles?

Yes, it is becoming increasingly common for PhD application reviewers to look at applicants' social media profiles as part of their evaluation process. This is because social media can provide valuable insights into an applicant's character, interests, and potential fit for the program.

2. What kind of information do PhD application reviewers look for on social media?

Reviewers may look for a variety of information on social media, including the applicant's academic background, research interests, publications or presentations, and involvement in relevant organizations or communities. They may also look for any red flags, such as inappropriate or offensive content, that could reflect poorly on the applicant.

3. Can what is posted on social media affect an applicant's chances of being accepted into a PhD program?

Yes, what is posted on social media can definitely affect an applicant's chances of being accepted into a PhD program. Reviewers may use social media as an additional source of information to evaluate an applicant's fit for the program and their potential as a researcher. Inappropriate or concerning content on social media could raise doubts about an applicant's professionalism and suitability for the program.

4. How can applicants ensure their social media profiles will not negatively impact their PhD application?

Applicants can take several steps to ensure their social media profiles will not negatively impact their PhD application. First, they can review and remove any potentially inappropriate or offensive content. They can also adjust their privacy settings to control who can view their posts and information. Additionally, applicants can use their social media profiles to showcase their academic achievements, research interests, and involvement in relevant communities.

5. Is it ethical for PhD application reviewers to look at applicants' social media profiles?

The ethical implications of reviewing applicants' social media profiles may vary depending on the institution and specific program. However, as long as the information obtained from social media is used for legitimate evaluation purposes and does not violate any laws or discrimination policies, it can be considered an ethical practice. Applicants should be aware that their social media profiles are public and may be viewed by potential reviewers, and should therefore ensure that their online presence is professional and appropriate.

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