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Classical Electrodynamics book

  1. Jan 23, 2016 #1
    Friends, can you suggest for some good books which can be studied in graduate level. Except Griffiths, I've completed it.
     
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  3. Jan 23, 2016 #2

    Doc Al

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  4. Jan 23, 2016 #3

    TSny

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  5. Jan 23, 2016 #4

    dextercioby

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  6. Jan 23, 2016 #5
    Landau and Livs 3rd volume is non-relativistic QM not EM. Panofsky and Phillips and Jackson can be considered graduate level. Another one not used anymore but good is an electromagnetics book by Stratton.
     
  7. Jan 24, 2016 #6

    Student100

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    He could just have an older edition set, or some type of translation thing with the volumes. The L&L text I have for E&M is volume 2. To avoid ambiguity, if the titles are roughly the same between editions/translations: Classical Field Theory is what you're looking for OP.

    It's much better than Jackson, I wouldn't recommend Jackson to anyone without a solid course using Jackson in the first place!

    Still basically the de facto text it seems. (Maybe more like a rite of passage?) It's also still the de facto "let me just Google the answers because this sucks" text. Not to hate on it too much, it is amazingly comprehensive and supplies plenty of would-be-physicists tears to fuel all those experiments at the LHC.
     
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  8. Jan 24, 2016 #7
    Classical Theory of Fields by LL (volume 2 in my collection) is truly excellent. It treats gravitation too. Most grad schools do not use it and use Jackson. CFT may treat topics in a way physics faculty are not in harmony with. The Electrodynamics books (Electrodynamics of Continuous Media Vol 6 in my collection) in the LL series are also excellent, although I got this assessment second-hand. I have not studied the book.
     
  9. Jan 24, 2016 #8
    Someone recommended me Sadiku. What's about that?
     
  10. Jan 26, 2016 #9

    jasonRF

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    Sadiku is at the same level as Griffiths, although it is an engineering book so has a different emphasis and has some different topics. Sadiku includes transmission lines, waveguides and basic antennas, but does not have special relativity and relativistic electrodynamics.

    Are you interested in engineering or physics? All of the books recommended so far are designed for physics; other books may make more sense if you are interested in engineering.
     
  11. Jan 28, 2016 #10
    Yeah, I'm absolutely interested in physics and already read Griffiths. I want something modern , advanced and systematic.
     
  12. Jan 28, 2016 #11

    jasonRF

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    Then don't bother with Sadiku.

    Enjoy the journey.

    jason
     
  13. Jan 29, 2016 #12

    vanhees71

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    Then take Landau-Lifshitz volume 2. Although not very new, it's modern in the sense that it uses relativity from the very beginning (I don't understand, why there are still written modern textbooks on classical electromagnetics not doing so). Another even more modern approach is provided by the textbook by Scheck

    http://www.springer.com/de/book/9783642279843
     
  14. Jan 29, 2016 #13
    I think Landau and Liv is good, but I would not use it as a textbook. I think the problems are (likely) harder than Jackson, and the consensus from reading the forums is even Jackson problems are daunting. In addition, I think LL has fewer and a more limited variety of problems. I do not think it is necessary for a textbook to start with relativity right off the bat, anymore than I think quantum mechanics should introduce intrinsic spin, which has no classical counterpart, right off the bat, a la Sakurai. I do like Ohanian's book, and Melvin Schwartz's book that do place emphasis on relativity, but I equally like Jackson.
    As an undergrad, I found Panofsky and Phillips very hard to follow, and actually found Jackson easier. Jackson was more discursive in the early chapters. Still, it is a big jump from the Resnick and Halliday treatment, and the first stages of Panofky where "dels" make their appearance half way down the first page.
    Jackson, is used to prepare physics grads for work in advanced physics. An older book, by Stratton, would make a good book at the grad level, but the emphasis is more on engineering, maybe the way physics grad EM was taught before 1960.

    I have not looked at Scheck (Van Trees), but I think I have another book by him that is good, but I think it treats mechanics.
     
  15. Jan 30, 2016 #14

    vanhees71

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    On the undergrad level, I'd highly recommend also the Feynman Lectures vol. II. It's a marvelous E&M book, also including enough relativity.
     
  16. Jan 30, 2016 #15
    I will seriously say that Jackson is tough to solve many problems, again many typical problems are not included in it. Is not there a book which could be more familiar and advantagable.
     
  17. Jan 30, 2016 #16
    Zangwill looks to me to be very accesible to someone of your background. According to a colleague who spoke with Zangwill he wrote it to replace Jackson's text.

    For a text on roughly the same level as Jackson's which may be easier to follow and work problems from is Schwinger, Deraad, Milton and Tsai. There is also the book by Franklin which uses cgs units :H.

    Landau-Lifshitz volume 2 (Classical Theory of Fields) and 8 (Electrodynamics of Continuous Media) are a pleasure to read but I would not jump there from Griffiths.
     
  18. Jan 31, 2016 #17

    vanhees71

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    What's so great with Zangwill's book? It's very conventional like Jackson. Perhaps it's good; I've flipped through it at a conference-book desk once and thought that I don't need it, having my good old copy of Jackson's book (fortunately the 2nd edition, using the Gaussian units throughout, but that's another topic).
     
  19. Jan 31, 2016 #18

    dextercioby

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    Zangwill uses the x4 = ict in his text which is a big minus for me.
     
  20. Jan 31, 2016 #19

    vanhees71

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    Oh no! Then it's a absolute no-go, although one of my most preferred text books on classical physics, Sommerfeld's Lectures on Theoretical Physics, also commit this sin, but that's written in the 1940ies and 1950ies, not in the 21st century!
     
  21. Jan 31, 2016 #20
    I have the impression that the goal of Zangwill's book is to teach Electrodynamics while Jackson's is to teach the Math Methods associated with Electrodynamics. The content is necessarily overlapping but you can tell, by searching through the first few chapters of each, the difference. Note that Zangwill, unlike Jackson, reviews the requisite mathematics during the first chapter which I take to mean that he has shifted part of the burden off of the potential reader and onto the text itself. As such it appeals to an audience who is still developing their mathematical prowess.

    Perhaps if a large percentage of undergraduate programs were not using books like Griffiths to prepare their students for Jackson then a book like Zangwill would not be necessary.
     
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