Empirical Formula of Sulfur & Oxygen Compound

In summary, a sample of 1.28 g of sulfur combines with oxygen to form a compound with a mass of 3.2 g. To find the empirical formula, the mass of oxygen was determined to be 1.92 g and converted to 0.24 mol. The mass of sulfur was also converted to 0.04 mol. While some sources suggest the formula should be SO3, the presence of oxygen in a compound means it is no longer in diatomic form and the empirical formula cannot be assumed to be SO6. It is likely that a single oxygen atom has combined with sulfur to form the compound.
  • #1
asadpasat
41
1
Please post this type of questions in HW section using the template.
A sample of sulfur having a mass of 1.28 g combines with oxygen to form a compound with a mass of 3.2g. What is the empirical formula.
So what i did is found the mass of oxygen which is 1.92g . Then converted the 1.28g S to 0.04 mol. Then converted the 1.92g O2 (as it says oxygen, or should it be just O?) to get 0.24mol O. I found online that the answer should be SO3, but I get SO6 because of Oxygen. Should I not assume it is diatomic, and just go with as just element?
 
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  • #2
asadpasat said:
A sample of sulfur having a mass of 1.28 g combines with oxygen to form a compound with a mass of 3.2g. What is the empirical formula.
So what i did is found the mass of oxygen which is 1.92g . Then converted the 1.28g S to 0.04 mol. Then converted the 1.92g O2 (as it says oxygen, or should it be just O?) to get 0.24mol O. I found online that the answer should be SO3, but I get SO6 because of Oxygen. Should I not assume it is diatomic, and just go with as just element?
When the oxygen is combined with another element in a compound, it is no longer in diatomic form. Plus, there's no such compound as SO6, AFAIK, unless the valence of S is 12 instead of 2.
 
  • #3
SteamKing said:
When the oxygen is combined with another element in a compound, it is no longer in diatomic form. Plus, there's no such compound as SO6, AFAIK, unless the valence of S is 12 instead of 2.
So when it says that oxygen is combining it should be just O, not O2. If i understood correctly.
 
  • #4
Yes a single oxygen atom has combined with some other element(s).
It may or may not have originally been an atom which was existing previously as part of diatomic oxygen.
 

Related to Empirical Formula of Sulfur & Oxygen Compound

What is the empirical formula of a sulfur and oxygen compound?

The empirical formula of a compound is the simplest whole number ratio of elements present in the compound. In the case of sulfur and oxygen, the empirical formula is SOx, where x is a whole number representing the ratio of sulfur to oxygen.

How do you determine the empirical formula of a sulfur and oxygen compound?

To determine the empirical formula of a sulfur and oxygen compound, we first need to determine the masses of each element present in the compound. Then, we divide the mass of each element by its atomic mass to get the moles of each element. Next, we divide each mole value by the smallest mole value to get the simplest whole number ratio of elements, which gives us the empirical formula.

Can the empirical formula of a sulfur and oxygen compound be the same as its molecular formula?

Yes, the empirical formula of a sulfur and oxygen compound can be the same as its molecular formula if the compound contains only one type of molecule. However, if the compound contains more than one type of molecule, the empirical formula will be different from the molecular formula.

Why is the empirical formula important in chemistry?

The empirical formula is important in chemistry because it helps us understand the composition of a compound and its properties. It also helps in identifying the type of bonding between atoms in a compound, which is crucial in predicting the chemical and physical behavior of the compound.

Can the empirical formula of a sulfur and oxygen compound change under different conditions?

Yes, the empirical formula of a sulfur and oxygen compound can change under different conditions. For example, if the compound is heated, it may undergo a chemical reaction that changes its molecular formula, and thus, its empirical formula. Similarly, changes in pressure or temperature can also affect the empirical formula of a compound.

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