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Homework Help: Gauss's Law Questions

  1. Sep 29, 2010 #1
    I was searching the forums and I found someone asking the same question a while back, but i am totally confused, I thought I was understanding this stuff up to this point.

    http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100928212107AAwXTlT&r=w [Broken]

    I posted and wrote up the whole problem on yahoo answers.

    If someone could break down this problem and make it easier for a very slow person to understand it would be greatly appreciated!

    Thanks
    Zack
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 29, 2010 #2

    kuruman

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    Hi imzack and welcome to PF. It would be easier if you posted the problem here. Anyway, for part (a): Can you use Gauss's Law to find the electric field at a point inside the sphere?
     
  4. Sep 29, 2010 #3
    yea, and just got the answers, but i didnt know and didnt understand how they got to them, is someone could break it down it would be most appreciated!!

    question-
    An early (incorrect) model of the hydrogen atom, suggested by J.J. Thomson, proposed that a positive cloud of charge +e was uniformly distributed throughout the volume of a sphere of radius R, with the electron (an equal magnitude negatively charged particle -e) at the center.
    A) using Gauss's law, show that the electron would be in equilibrium at the center and, if displaced from the center a distance r<R, would experience a restoring force of the form F=-Kr, where K is a constant.
    B) Show that K=(ke)(E^2)/R^3
    C)Find an expression for the frequency f of simple harmonic oscillations that an electron of mass me would undergo if displaced a small distance (<R) from the center and released.
    D) Calculated a numerical value for R that would result in a frequency of 2.47*10^15 Hz, the frequency of the light radiated in the most intense in the hydrogen spectrum.


    answer is

    http://tinypic.com/r/14ma06o/7

    14ma06o.jpg

    <a href="http://tinypic.com?ref=14ma06o" target="_blank"><img src="http://i53.tinypic.com/14ma06o.jpg" border="0" alt="Image and video hosting by TinyPic"></a>




    and thank you for your welcome!!!
     
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