How do you make neutral wire 'neutral'?

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At first I always imagine that there were 2 live wires connected to a source and a load, and one of them is connected to the ground via an additional wire, but apparently people said this is wrong, because it would just blow the fuse, as you are 'short circuit' - ing the connection. Is this true?
 

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Nugatory
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To make a wire neutral you start with a floating wire and you connect it to ground, so that it is no longer floating and is now at the same potential as ground.

This only works with a floating wire, and after you make that connection none of the wires in the circuit will be floating.

There is no point in continuing this discussion or you continuing to post new threads until you have read and understood the answers you've already been given. One thing that might help would be for you stop using the words "live" and "neutral" - instead of saying that a wire is live or neutral, state its potential relative to ground.
 
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Ok, but What's the difference between a usual wire and a floating wire?
 
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Ok, but What's the difference between a usual wire and a floating wire?
A wire is floating if the voltage difference between it and the earth under your feet is not fixed. This is only possible if no wire in the circuit is connected to the earth under you feet.

You were directed to the Wikipedia article on this many posts back. Go read it again.
 
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Thanks, I have another question. Does the neutral wire and the ground really have the same electric potential, isn't there voltage drop due to the wire's resistance?
 
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Thanks, I have another question. Does the neutral wire and the ground really have the same electric potential, isn't there voltage drop due to the wire's resistance?
Yes, there may be a voltage drop across the connection between neutral and earth ground because of the resistance in that connection. We explained that in your first thread - it is the reason why it is not safe to touch the neutral wire in a circuit even though it is ostensibly connected to ground.

The electrical code (at least where I live) has an entire chapter about the right way to make the connection to ground so that the resistance is as low as possible and the voltage difference between neutral and ground is very small. Thus, we usually analyze circuits as if the voltage difference between neutral and ground is zero, but it would be more precise to say that the voltage difference between neutral and ground is very close to zero unless something has gone wrong somewhere.

It's clear from the rate at which are making new posts that you aren't taking the time to read and understand the answers you've already received before asking your next question. This is not an effective way of learning, so you're going to have to stop asking more questions and starting new threads until you've taken the time to study what's already been posted. Your account has been banned from making new posts for 72 hours.
 
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sophiecentaur
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Ok, but What's the difference between a usual wire and a floating wire?
What's a "usual wire? If you mean a wire with a defined Potential with respect to ground then there's your answer. A floating wire has an undefined Potential
Connect a wire to Earth via a reasonably low resistance circuit and its `Potential to Earth' can be defined. If the circuit is disconnected (or reasonably well insulated) then you can say it floats.
A body that is 'floating' on still water can be easily pushed in any direction. The analogy to electricity is a fair one.
 

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