How does the shock detection switch work in the ASLS15 model?

In summary, the shock switch is a device that senses high accelerations and turns on. It is made up of two conducting legs that are insulated from the housing, and one leg is attached to the outer gold plated housing. When shaken, you can hear a rattle as if there is a ball inside the device. I was wondering if there is a ball inside a conductive cylinder connected to the middle leg that rises and touches the top of the housing, which is connected to the other leg. I found a couple things that suggest it could be a ball on a spring, but I am unsure if that is how it works.
  • #1
As part of an engineering design project, I am using shock switches to measure accelerations of an object. As the name suggests they are just switches that turn on when a shock above a certain value is experienced.

Does anyone know the details about how the switch contact is closed when it experiences a high enough shock in the following shock switch ?http://uk.farnell.com/assemtech/asls15/switch-acceleration-15g/dp/4229071?Ntt=422-9071"

I can't find any information on the internal structure of this shock switch anywhere on the net.

One of the conducting legs is attached to the outer gold plated housing and the other goes right through into the middle of the device, insulated from the housing. When you shake the device hard enough (over its shock threshold), you can hear a rattle, as if there is some sort of ball in there. I was thinking that there might be a ball contained inside a conductive cylinder connected to the middle leg that rises and touches the top of the housing, which is connected to the other leg, hence completing the circuit between the two legs. But why would the ball only move up and down the cylinder when a high enough acceleration is applied? Surely if it is just a friction fit cylinder, then the ball would get stuck at the top and the switch would be permanently closed?

I really need to know the mechanics behind this device to write about in my design report.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks

Paul
 
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  • #2
paul_harris77 said:
As part of an engineering design project, I am using shock switches to measure accelerations of an object. As the name suggests they are just switches that turn on when a shock above a certain value is experienced.

Does anyone know the details about how the switch contact is closed when it experiences a high enough shock in the following shock switch ?http://uk.farnell.com/assemtech/asls15/switch-acceleration-15g/dp/4229071?Ntt=422-9071"

I can't find any information on the internal structure of this shock switch anywhere on the net.

One of the conducting legs is attached to the outer gold plated housing and the other goes right through into the middle of the device, insulated from the housing. When you shake the device hard enough (over its shock threshold), you can hear a rattle, as if there is some sort of ball in there. I was thinking that there might be a ball contained inside a conductive cylinder connected to the middle leg that rises and touches the top of the housing, which is connected to the other leg, hence completing the circuit between the two legs. But why would the ball only move up and down the cylinder when a high enough acceleration is applied? Surely if it is just a friction fit cylinder, then the ball would get stuck at the top and the switch would be permanently closed?

I really need to know the mechanics behind this device to write about in my design report.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks

Paul

Looks pretty inexpensive. Can you just cut one open?

I found a couple things with Google Images, but no great hits with a quick search. You could try browsing at wikipatents.com some -- it's probably patented:

http://www.wikipatents.com/simple_text_search [Broken]

.
 
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  • #3
Thanks for reply.

I could attempt to cut one open but I would prefer not to since I only have a week left to write the report and may need to test all of them. I can't find any patent filed by Assemtech or a patent on any similar device.

I have found something that suggests it could be a ball on a spring. Presumably it works via base excitation but I am unsure.
 
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1. What is a shock detection switch?

A shock detection switch is a type of sensor that is used to detect sudden impacts or vibrations. It is commonly used in electronic devices to protect them from damage caused by drops or other types of shock.

2. How does a shock detection switch work?

The switch works by using a small metal ball or spring inside a sealed chamber. When the device experiences a shock, the ball or spring moves and completes the circuit, triggering an alarm or other response.

3. What types of devices use shock detection switches?

Shock detection switches are commonly used in laptops, smartphones, and other portable electronic devices. They can also be used in industrial equipment, vehicles, and other machinery to detect and prevent damage from impacts.

4. Are there different sensitivity levels for shock detection switches?

Yes, there are different sensitivity levels for shock detection switches. Some switches are designed to only detect strong impacts, while others are more sensitive and can detect even minor vibrations. The sensitivity level can often be adjusted or customized for specific applications.

5. Can shock detection switches be reset after they have been triggered?

Yes, most shock detection switches can be reset after they have been triggered. This can be done manually or automatically, depending on the design of the switch. Once the switch has been reset, it will be ready to detect any new shocks or impacts.

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