How is this pronounced? (subitize)

  1. Jan 27, 2008 #1

    Math Is Hard

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    subitize

    I looked it up in an online dictionary and it said it is pronounced like "soobitize". However, we had a guest lecturer in class last week and she pronounced it like "suhbitize".

    Does anyone know which is correct?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 27, 2008 #2
    Its probably dependant upon where the speaker is from. For example, people from the US and Brits might say it differently. A better dictionary might even say that it may be used either way. LOL, it doesn't even show up in the Miriam-Webster 11th Edition I have.
     
  4. Jan 27, 2008 #3

    Evo

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    I'd go with suhbitize. All such words, subterfuge, subsidize, subsistence, etc... all have the same pronunciation.
     
  5. Jan 27, 2008 #4

    Math Is Hard

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    Thanks for the help. I have a feeling that whichever one I pick, it will be the opposite of what the professor thinks it is. LOL
    But I guess I will go with "suhb".
     
  6. Jan 27, 2008 #5

    Astronuc

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    On the other hand, in the words: subterfuge, subsidize, subsistence, the letter 'b' is followed by a consonant, so by convention sub is pronounce suhb, and is usually a separate syllable (and often a prefix). Often, when the group 'sub' is followed by a vowel, the u is long, soo, and the b is part of the second syllable (su·bi·tize). I think the English and Australians would pronounce syoobitize.

    subitize - to perceive at a glance the number of items presented.
     
  7. Jan 27, 2008 #6

    Gokul43201

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    Definitely soobitize.
     
  8. Jan 28, 2008 #7

    robphy

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  9. Jan 28, 2008 #8
    I'm pretty sure my daughter is good at subitizing, as she can add 13 digit numbers in her head and give the right answer immediately. I asked her what's 2 trillion plus 3 trillion and she got it in a flash.
     
  10. Jan 28, 2008 #9

    DaveC426913

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    Hmph. And I got in trouble yesterday for pronouncing chootney instead of chuhtney.
     
  11. Jan 28, 2008 #10

    Moonbear

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    Well, without having a clue what the word meant (thanks to Astronuc for providing the definition) nor having ever seen or heard it pronounced before, upon seeing it in the thread title, I pronounced it soo-bi-tize. Astronuc's explanation makes sense of why it's NOT suhb-i-tize (that would just break every spelling, syllabication and pronunciation rule I've ever learned).
     
  12. Jan 28, 2008 #11

    Evo

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    Yep, I didn't even think of that.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2008
  13. Jan 28, 2008 #12
    I don't know about that. There's subatomic, subequal, subinvariant, subordinate, suburb.

    I think the issue is that the prefix sub-, meaning under or less than, is probably always pronounced the same regardless of the next letter. The thing that makes subitize different is that sub- is not a prefix in that word. It derives from the latin word subitus, meaning sudden.
     
  14. Jan 28, 2008 #13

    BobG

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    It's from subito, which is pronounced soob-ito, so I'd assume it's pronounced soob-itize.

    It's a niche word you don't see in everyday use and isn't even included in a lot of dictionaries, so maybe the lecturer just guessed.

    Interesting subject. It's how you can teach a dog or horse to count. Remember how Roy Roger's horse, Trigger, could count to three? If Roy Rogers had a parrot instead of a horse, he could have 'counted' all the way up to four! Of course, I guess that would have required quite a few other changes in the show, as well.

    I've been working with my dog to see how high she can go numerically. So far, we're up to [tex]\int^{\pi}_0 sin(x) dx[/tex]
     
  15. Jan 28, 2008 #14

    jim mcnamara

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    suberin - soo-ber-in
    subitize - soo-bi-tize

    Astronuc has it - no following consonant after the letter "b"
     
  16. Jan 28, 2008 #15

    Math Is Hard

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    Ordinarily, I would think that it was just a guess, but this was a cognitive psychology post-doc who pronounced it "suhbitize". It may fall outside of her area of specialization, but I would think that she had heard this word pronounced before.
     
  17. Jan 28, 2008 #16

    dst

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    Soob (more so 'syoobitise"), it feels 'natural' to me.

    But then again, I just found out it's Oiler, not Euler :grumpy:
     
  18. Jan 28, 2008 #17

    Ivan Seeking

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    Tsubitize - to perceive at a glance everything not yet done by Ivan.
     
  19. Jan 28, 2008 #18

    dst

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    Soob, it feels 'natural' to me.

    But then again, I just found out it's Oiler, not Euler :grumpy:

    Now where's that book on Oiclid's Elements...
     
  20. Jan 28, 2008 #19

    Evo

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    :rofl: Now Tsubitize is easy. I guess I won't be giving out pronunciations when I'm going to sleep anymore. :redface:
     
  21. Jan 28, 2008 #20

    Math Is Hard

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    :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl: :rofl:
     
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