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HP desktop that shuts off without warning

  1. Aug 11, 2005 #1
    I have a HP desktop that shuts off without warning after running for a few hours. I beleive it's because the computer is not in a well ventilated area and heats up. Are there any free utilities to see how hot my CPU gets?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 12, 2005 #2
    get motherboard monitor here.Its free.
    http://mbm.livewiredev.com/

    open the system up and check the fans are all running ,blow out the dust especially around the cpu heatsink and in the power supply..If the system is fairly old its a good idea to pull off the cpu heatsink and reseat it with some new thermal paste.
     
  4. Aug 12, 2005 #3
    It's from 2000 so you're probably right. Thanks for the tips
     
  5. Aug 12, 2005 #4

    dduardo

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    Is it a complete shutdown or does it reboot? If it is rebooting then it could be a memory issue.
     
  6. Aug 12, 2005 #5
    It doesn't reboot. It just turns off instantly without warning. After which I can't turn it back on for 30 minutes. Based on this I've come to the conclusion that it needed to cool off before I could turn it back on. Whether it's the CPU that's overheating or the power supply I don't know.
     
  7. Aug 12, 2005 #6

    mezarashi

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    Yes, sounds like it could be a cooling problem, but not necessarily a cooling problem. You might need to try running a game like Doom3 or something else CPU intensive to see if it shutsdown immediately after initiating.
     
  8. Aug 12, 2005 #7

    dduardo

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    This is my suggestion:

    1) Open the case and pull out all unnecessary cards. Everything but video.
    2) Turn on the machine and observe if any of the fans are not working.
    3) If all the fans are working, let the machine run some CPU intensive task. Then reboot and enter the bios to check what the temperature is of the machine.
    4)If the temperature is larger than 60 Degrees C, I would take off the heat sink and see if there is a good coat of thermal paste. Also clean out the fins of the heat sink to allow maximum heat transfer
    5)If the temperature is fine, then I would look into trying out a different power supply.
     
  9. Aug 12, 2005 #8
    If it let you restart immediately, then chances are it's a PSU reset... check the fan on your power supply and make sure it is working.

    There is a chance that the reset is being caused by an overcurrent... this could be heat-related as well since temperature will affect the current sensors to some extent.

    Follow dduardo's recommendations.
     
  10. Aug 12, 2005 #9
    My BIOS doesn't have temperature.
     
  11. Aug 12, 2005 #10
    If you think its overheating, open up the case and make sure nothing is blocking the air flow. Air inside a computer should move from front to back. Does the case have any fans or room for any?
     
  12. Aug 12, 2005 #11

    dduardo

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    It should be under "PC Health Status" or something similar in the bios configuration. It depends on the bios manufacturer. How old is your computer? Most moderm systems can read cpu core temperature.
     
  13. Aug 12, 2005 #12
    Most HP/IBM/Dell (if any? ) etc don't measure the CPU temperature
     
  14. Aug 12, 2005 #13
    It's an HP from 2000 and I updated the BIOS to a 2001 version. I'll check again when I get home but I highly doubt it's there.
     
  15. Aug 12, 2005 #14

    dduardo

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    This is certainly not the case.
     
  16. Aug 13, 2005 #15
    I've scoured every part of my BIOS possible and I see nothing about temperature. I know what you're talking about though because i have experience with other computers with a BIOS that has that.
     
  17. Aug 13, 2005 #16

    dduardo

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    So my conclusion would be that your computer doesn't have the proper equipment to measure the core temperature of the processor. Time for an upgrade! I would definitely say 5 years is a good number.
     
  18. Aug 13, 2005 #17
    In this case an upgrade would mean nearly a whole computer and the original cause of failure would be gone...

    Why can't I edit and fix my post up there? No edit button for me? :confused:
     
  19. Aug 13, 2005 #18

    dduardo

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    After a certain time you can't edit your posts. This prevents people from changing the conversation midway in a thread.
     
  20. Aug 13, 2005 #19
    Bah... I guess that means I will have proofread more thoroughly in these forums in the future... :yuck:
     
  21. Aug 14, 2005 #20
    When you say upgrade what do you mean? A new computer? A new motherboard?
     
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