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I have a material that conducts heat very rapidly

  1. Jan 8, 2018 #1
    I tested it by heating it up for 2 min on a electric stove and pour about 200 to 300 ml water in bowl and did a very quick dip in and out like that and when i touch it, it was cold same temperature as the water. I also test with aluminium but when I touch it, it was will hot I burnt my finger in the process. I wanted to know if it conducts heat like can it also conduct electricity.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 8, 2018 #2

    DrClaude

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    It doesn't sound like the material has a is good conductor as much as it has a very low or very high heat capacity. Can you measure its temperature after heating?
     
  4. Jan 8, 2018 #3
    I don' have any measuring tool.
     
  5. Jan 8, 2018 #4
    I did however pre-heated the stove it was yellow hot probably around 200+ degrees and the water is between 18 to 24 degrees so from the you can calculate and I put the material for 2 to 3 seconds in the water after heating it up for 2 mins.
     
  6. Jan 8, 2018 #5

    lekh2003

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    The problem is that "burnt my finger" isn't a measurement of temperature.
     
  7. Jan 8, 2018 #6

    berkeman

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  8. Jan 8, 2018 #7

    TeethWhitener

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    Seriously:
    A glowing yellow heating element implies a temperature of well over 1000°C.

    But something is amiss, because aluminum melts at ~650°C, so there's something else the OP isn't telling us.
     
  9. Jan 8, 2018 #8
    It is an electric stove most likely containing tungsten filament and it does periodically turns on and off to maintain temperature to support household metal item like aluminium.
     
  10. Jan 8, 2018 #9
    Iam gonna test it with air/wind aswell
     
  11. Jan 8, 2018 #10

    lekh2003

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    Do you know the model of the stove?
     
  12. Jan 9, 2018 #11
    Yeah its Bush AE66DCA I don' thing it has tungsten filament it' probably the ceramic glass or the lighting in the kitcen that made it look yellow or iam just colour blind but that not important. What is important is that cooled very rapidly compared to other metals like aluminium and yes the material is a matel alloy.
     
  13. Jan 9, 2018 #12

    lekh2003

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  14. Jan 9, 2018 #13

    Borek

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    You can't, just like you can't say maximum speed from the car power.
     
  15. Jan 9, 2018 #14

    lekh2003

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    Well, could you find anything to help the OP from the model information?
     
  16. Jan 9, 2018 #15
    The thermostat goes to 250 C, wich is a common temperature maximum temperature for an oven. Without a thermostat the oven would eventually get hotter, but of course it's not built for that.
    A common power for an oven is 3kW. The rest will be for the plates on top of the stove. Where I live you need a 3-phase connection to get 9.7 kW, so you can use 3 x 25A x 240 V.
     
  17. Jan 9, 2018 #16

    ZapperZ

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    Here's an obvious problem with your question. You are comparing this mysterious material with "aluminum", but you seem to have neglected to tell us the mass of this material and the mass of the aluminum.

    As has been stated, the issue of "heat capacity" cannot be ignore. Even when you have to material made up of the SAME stuff, but of different mass, the "heat retention" will be different for those two material. This is the significance of the name "heat capacity", which appears to have escaped you.

    Comparing heat retention of a thin, light wire with a heavy aluminum pot is comparing apples to oranges. There are MORE variables or parameters involved here than just the type of material they are made of.

    Zz.
     
  18. Jan 9, 2018 #17

    rbelli1

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    Please post photos of the two objects you are testing. If you can weigh them both too that would be even better.

    BoB
     
  19. Jan 25, 2018 #18
    You can test it Yourself its found in old hard drive aluminum platters they are called. You magnetically store data in them they are made of aluminum, platinum and palladium. I can experiment due to lack of equipment etc.
     

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  20. Jan 25, 2018 #19

    ZapperZ

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    This is highly ambiguous. It doesn't tell us exactly what you did. What EXACTLY was the the two items that you "tested" in Post #1? And can't you even weigh each of these items to find the mass? It appears that you didn't understand the issues that we brought up with the scenario that you described.

    Zz.
     
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