Magnet through Pipe Experiment, continued

In summary, the changing magnetic field of a falling magnet induces currents in the pipe which slows its descent. The force applied from the outside increases the momentum carried by the induced currents. The magnet's interaction with the pipe is similar to interrupting DC current and quantum mechanics is not required for this problem. The momentum carried by the electrons is a subject for quantum physics.
  • #1
Samson4
245
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The changing magnetic field of a falling magnet induces currents in the pipe that slows it's fall through the pipe.

Question:
If the induced currents are decreasing the magnets descent then they must themselves have momentum. How is it dissipated once the magnet has passed through the end of the pipe? Does it simply oscillate similar to an lc circuit?
 
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  • #2
The pipe in which current take place undertakes force downward. One should apply upward force from outside so that it does not move.
 
  • #3
anuttarasammyak said:
The pipe in which current take place undertakes force downward. One should apply upward force from outside so that it does not move.
That applied force increases the momentum that is carried in the currents induced by the magnet. If they were both free falling then technically it would be the same as them being stationary. I'm asking if the magnet exciting the pipe is similar to interrupting dc current.
 
  • #4
I think we're in the realm of quantum physics when we deal with electron momentum.
 
  • #5
rude man said:
I think we're in the realm of quantum physics when we deal with electron momentum.
There's no quantum mechanics required for this problem - we're working with bulk currents and properties of matter that are adequately described by classical electrodynamics.
 
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  • #6
Quoting the OP: "That applied force increases the momentum that is carried in the currents induced by the magnet."

Clearly he was referring to the momentum carried by the electrons, not the magnet. It's a subject for quantum physics.
 

1. How does the magnet move through the pipe?

The magnet moves through the pipe due to the interaction between the magnetic field of the magnet and the electric current induced in the pipe.

2. Why does the magnet slow down as it moves through the pipe?

The magnetic field of the magnet induces an electric current in the pipe, which in turn creates a magnetic field that opposes the magnet's movement. This opposing force causes the magnet to slow down.

3. Can any type of pipe be used for this experiment?

Yes, any non-magnetic pipe can be used for this experiment. Materials such as copper, aluminum, and plastic are commonly used.

4. What factors affect the speed of the magnet through the pipe?

The speed of the magnet through the pipe is affected by the strength of the magnet, the thickness and material of the pipe, and the speed of the electric current induced in the pipe.

5. Is this experiment only applicable to magnets and pipes?

No, this experiment can also be done with other conductive materials such as aluminum foil or a metal rod. The key is to have a moving magnetic field interacting with a conductive material to induce an electric current.

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