Mass going up an inclined plane with initial velocity Vo

In summary, the conversation discusses two different ways of determining the time it takes for a box to stop on an incline. However, the two methods give conflicting answers and it is not clear which one is correct. The question being addressed is how much time it will take for the box to stop on the incline. The conversation also mentions the importance of showing your work and not just posting images of the problem. It is also noted that the weight is not the only force acting on the mass in the vertical direction and that acceleration is caused by a force, which may not have been correctly determined in the given examples.
  • #1
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1. Vo
Mass=m


2.So we tried two ways of doing this, one is by taking the y component of the i itial velocity and using that and the other by using the component of its weight parallel to the initial velocity.They give conflicting answers.

For the left one it turns out to be t=Vosinθ/g

But for the right its t=Vo/gsinθ
received_463357710740654.jpeg
mVo/gsinθ
Any thoughts?
 

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  • #2
You have not actually shown your ways translated into maths or how you translate your sketches to an equation to solve. You also have not stated what the actual question is.
 
  • #3
Orodruin said:
You have not actually shown your ways translated into maths or how you translate your sketches to an equation to solve. You also have not stated what the actual question is.
The question was how much time will it take for the box to stop up the incline
 
  • #4
You still have not shown your actual attempt. Please note that this is required by forum rules.
 
  • #5
Orodruin said:
You still have not shown your actual attempt. Please note that this is required by forum rules.
Here
20180829_204200.jpeg
 

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  • #7
Please read the homework guidelines.
Do not simply post images of the problem statement or your work.
Please make the effort to type up the problem statement and your work. Ask yourself "If I can't be bothered to spend my time typing it, why should they be bothered to spend their time reading it, much less responding to it?" Use images for supporting figures. You may, of course, attach an electronic copy of the problem statement in addition to the typed version. Indeed, if it's a complicated or long problem, you probably should, but you should always provide a typed version as well.

While posting images may be convenient for you, it's actually one of the most effective ways of getting your request for help ignored. Images are often too big, too small, rotated, upside down, out of focus, dimly lit, or of otherwise poor quality. Your handwriting may not be as easy to read as you think it is. Even when images are readable, they often make viewing and responding to a thread very inconvenient, particularly on a mobile device. Moreover, they're a hindrance to the helpers as portions of the problem statement or your work can't easily be quoted. Using images alone doesn't qualify as filling out the homework template, so your post may be deleted.

Also, the weight is not the only force that acts on the mass in the vertical direction.
 
  • #8
The force mg is not going to act on the object as depicted by you in the first case, the whole mg will not cause retardation in the object. Acceleration takes place because of a force, here, you have not correctly determined the force which will act on the object.
 

1. How does the initial velocity affect the mass going up an inclined plane?

The initial velocity, Vo, plays a crucial role in determining the motion of the mass on an inclined plane. It determines the initial kinetic energy of the mass, which is then converted into potential energy as the mass moves up the incline. The higher the initial velocity, the more kinetic energy the mass has and the higher it will be able to climb up the incline.

2. What is the relationship between the angle of incline and the mass going up the inclined plane?

The angle of incline directly affects the force of gravity acting on the mass. As the angle increases, the force of gravity component pulling the mass down the incline also increases. This means that the mass will require more energy to overcome this downward force and move up the incline. Therefore, the higher the angle of incline, the less distance the mass will be able to travel up the incline.

3. How does the mass of the object impact its motion on an inclined plane?

The mass of the object affects its motion on an inclined plane in two ways. Firstly, a heavier mass will require more force to move up the incline compared to a lighter mass. Secondly, a heavier mass will have more potential energy at the top of the incline, meaning it will have a greater velocity as it moves down the incline due to the conversion of potential energy into kinetic energy.

4. Does the surface of the inclined plane affect the motion of the mass?

Yes, the surface of the inclined plane can greatly impact the motion of the mass. A rough surface will result in more friction between the mass and the surface, making it more difficult for the mass to move up the incline. On the other hand, a smooth surface will have less friction, allowing the mass to move more easily up the incline.

5. Can the mass reach a point of equilibrium on the inclined plane?

Yes, the mass can reach a point of equilibrium on the inclined plane if the angle of incline, initial velocity, and mass are all balanced. At this point, the force of gravity pulling the mass down the incline is equal to the force of the incline pushing the mass up. This results in the mass remaining stationary on the incline, with no net movement in either direction.

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